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Keeping it Human

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Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Ghost Bikes are small memorials for bicyclists who are killed or hit on the street. A bicycle is painted all white and locked to a street sign near the crash site, accompanied by a small plaque. Ghost Bikes are small memorials for bicyclists who are killed or hit on the street. A bicycle is painted all white and locked to a street sign near the crash site, accompanied by a small plaque. (Amy Pearl)

Chris Hayes, editor-at-large of The Nation and host of "Up with Chris Hayes" on MSNBC, continues the discussion about the Ryan Plan and its proposed cuts in entitlement spending. Then: WNYC reporter, Alex Goldmark, reports on police procedures following cyclist fatalities in New York City. Plus: literary scholar Jonathan Gottschall, talks about his new book The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human; and leading social theorist, David Harvey, discusses how cities are at the center of both capital and class struggles in his new book, Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution

What's Up with Chris Hayes?

Christopher Hayes, editor-at-large of The Nation and host of "Up With Chris Hayes" on MSNBC, discusses the latest in politics and Paul Ryan's budget proposal.

Comments [5]

Bike Crash Fatalities and Police Reporting

WNYC reporter Alex Goldmark details police procedures following cyclist fatalities and why so few drivers face charges.

Comments [69]

Open Phones: Open Source Conversation

Brian takes your suggestions for tomorrow's conversation. Call or comment here!

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Rebel in the City

David Harvey, leading social theorist, Distinguished Professor of anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and author of Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, discusses how cities are at the center of both capital and class struggles--and asks how cities might be reorganized to be more just.

Comments [42]

The Science Behind Telling Stories

In his ongoing efforts to bring more science to the humanities, Jonathan Gottschall looks at the human "instinct" for narrative. Gottschall teaches English at Washington & Jefferson College and is the author of the new book The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human

Comments [15]

Wallace and Westmoreland

David Blum, editor of Kindle Singles at Amazon, adjunct professor at Columbia School of Journalism, and author of TICK...TICK...TICK...The Long Life and Turbulent Times of 60 Minutes, talks about the Westmoreland v. CBS case, its affect on Mike Wallace, and history's verdict on the accusations.

Comments [7]

Manhattan Skyline with Empire State building in view

Listen: David Harvey on Whether War is Inevitable

David Harvey, leading social theorist, Distinguished Professor of anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and author of Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution, recently came on the Brian Lehrer Show to discuss how cities are at the center of both capital and class struggles--and asks how cities might be reorganized to be more just. When he was here, he answered the End of War question: Is war inevitable? Listen. 

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