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Politics Week: Transportation Bill, Supreme Court Fallout, More

Friday, March 30, 2012

Melinda Henneberger, anchor blogger for She the PeopleThe Washington Post’s women’s blog, and Matt Bai, chief political correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, look back at the week's political news.

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Matt Bai and Melinda Henneberger
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Comments [18]

@David -

The best and the brightest DO NOT go to med school. They go into banking careers where the prospect of princely reward for less work is much higher. There are plenty of well-qualified med school candidates who will forgo getting rich from the injury and sickness of others but who definitely should not go broke because they choose to do so. If it takes a new branch of government service with its own schools and academy and hospitals then so be it.
Why do you think the nations healthcare bill is such a high percentage of GDP. Other countries provide the same (better if you take into account the number of uninsured citizens) than we do. It is time to change the game.

Mar. 31 2012 08:50 AM
sophia

In the US your wait depends on how rich you are, and in most countries your wait depends on how sick you are.

I'm not crying over the rich person who has to wait for a knee replacement, and you're not crying for the poor person who has to wait for a kidney replacement.

Mar. 30 2012 06:45 PM
David from Frederickburg, VA

@sophia

You'll be crying your own river when you have to wait 2 months for an appointment due to a doctor shortage.

Mar. 30 2012 04:05 PM
sophia

"Do you think people smart enough to be doctors couldn't find something else to do for a living?"

And if what they care most about is getting rich, they should.

"Do we really expect doctors to be paid at rates far below people shoving paper around? (It's called the financial market)

If the base of comparison is Wall Street traders, I guess doctors should minister exclusively to Saudi Princes.

"Do we really expect the best & brightest to go to college for 4 years, medical school for 4 years, and then residency training and earn as much as a teacher?"

You mean be paid a reasonable upper middle-class salary like doctors in most other industrialized countries?

"Do you have any idea how much all that training costs, both in dollars..."

With which they could be assisted, as they are in other developed countries.

"& in putting the rest of their lives on hold?"

And all they'll get is an above average salary, prestige, and meaningful work. Cry me a river.

Mar. 30 2012 02:02 PM
David from Fredericksburg, VA

@RUCB_Alum

Do you think people smart enough to be doctors couldn't find something else to do for a living?

Do we really expect doctors to be paid at rates far below people shoving paper around? (It's called the financial market)

Do we really expect the best & brightest to go to college for 4 years, medical school for 4 years, and then residency training and earn as much as a teacher? Do you have any idea how much all that training costs, both in dollars & in putting the rest of their lives on hold?

Mar. 30 2012 01:44 PM

@David from VA -

My scheme would snap that pretty quickly as an ever-increasing segment of the population is covered ONLY by MediCare. A doctor would be shutting the door on half the potential market.

Mar. 30 2012 12:25 PM
David from Fredericksburg, VA

@RUCB_Alum

Doctors are leaving Medicare participation in increasing numbers. The terrible reimbursements coupled with ever more onerous regulations are the cause.

Mar. 30 2012 11:02 AM
susan from Upper West Side

Why do my taxes have to pay for health insurance for congress, the supreme court and the president when we pay $20,000 a year for our health insurance that doesn't really cover that much. I think health insurance is a ponzi scheme just waiting to collapse just like the financial markets did. I would have been happy with LOWERING the age of eligibillity for Medicare to age 0. The LAST thing I want is to have to continue to deal with the corrupt insurance companies AFTER I turn age 65.

Mar. 30 2012 10:33 AM

Hey if the individual mandate falls at the national level how long can it stand on a state basis. If SCOTUS can't kill Obamacare without killing Romneycare, too. Or can it?

Try JacksCare - Lower the MediCare eligible age to 50 immediately. This makes older workers MORE attractive to corporations since they don't have to provide them a health benefit. Increase withholding from 2.5% to 3.5% to cover the bulge. Lower Medicare eligible age by 5 years every four years...Bend the cost curve slowly and react to issues wisely. Private insurance is STILL available for those who want it but anyone who is MediCare eligible won't need it. In 40 years, everybody is covered.

Mar. 30 2012 10:29 AM

there are more than 2 sides

Mar. 30 2012 10:28 AM
sophia

If the President was "successful" in moving his party and the Republicans weren't, it's only a continuation of 30 years of the Republican party being truly successful in moving the Overton Window ever rightward.

Mar. 30 2012 10:26 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

Amen David - also, I would like to see the States rise up to pass a constitutional amendment putting term limits on congress.

Mar. 30 2012 10:26 AM
Judith from Brooklyn

The reason Ryan says he doesn't know who will bear the burden of his tax reform plan is that he knows it is the middle class and if he says that out loud it will kill all chance of its adoption (unless Republicans can disenfranchise enough voters through their undemocratic voter ID laws).

Mar. 30 2012 10:25 AM
Mike from Manhattan from Manhattan

Brian is wrong. The home mortgage deduction is limited. You may not deduct interest on more than $1,000,000 of home acquisition debt for your main home and secondary residence. Since the average cost of an apartment in Manhattan is over $1,000,000 even that high limit can hit people who are middle class by New York standards.

Mar. 30 2012 10:24 AM
Bobby G from East Village

Mat Bai said it. Politics trumps Congress acting in the interest of the country.

Mar. 30 2012 10:22 AM
David from Fredericksburg, VA

WHEN are people going to GET that STATES CAN do some things that the FEDERAL government CAN'T?

Obamacare is like Romneycare - NO, IT'S NOT (constitutionally speaking). The Massachusetts law is a STATE law, the law under review in the Supreme Court is FEDERAL law. The question is whether congress has exceeded their ENUMERATED powers.

Please familiarize yourselves with the 10th amendment:
(from http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights_transcript.html)

"The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people."

Mar. 30 2012 10:17 AM
sophia

As a liberal I say Woo-Hoo. Not for political reasons, (which are the only reasons the admin pushed this Heritage Foundations creation),

but because this bill is an insurance company bail-out. It strengthens the elements in our system that are destroying it: for profit parisitic insurance companies.

Mar. 30 2012 10:16 AM
carolita from nyc

how bad can things go if the law is struck down, when Romney offered basically the same thing? It just tells electors that even republicans wanted it until Obama offered it, and that therefore a lot of people want it on both sides once they look past the politics, and electing Obama again might increase our chances of getting something else quite similar?

Mar. 30 2012 10:13 AM

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