Streams

Sheldon Silver doesn't like professors with cookie-cutter districts

Monday, January 24, 2011 - 05:52 PM

It's not that Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver expressed support for non-partisan redistricting that's so interesting in this interview with Sam Roberts, but the caveat that he attaches to it.

"To send a few professors out with a cookie-cutter and just have them plop districts down as they see fit, i don't think serves the people of this state. It doesn't serve the people of my community, especially with interpretations of the Civil Rights law, as they are now."

Silver also lays out a compromise on disclosing outside sources of income, and offers and complex view on the commuter tax.

3:00
linking rent-regulation laws to a property-tax cap
"I don't think it's necessary to pass them together, per se."

4:04
"We should have non-partisan redistricting, no question about it."

4:30
"To send a few professors out with a cookie-cutter and just have them plop districts down as they see fit, i don't think serves the people of this state. It doesn't serve the people of my community, especially with interpretations of the Civil Rights law, as they are now."

6:08
"I believe that anybody who has a client that does business with the state, that has a lobbyists registered with the state, ought to be disclosed. Very clearly, people that have no business with the state and might be embarrassed by a disclosure have no reason to be disclosed, although to disclose them to an ethics commission is something I wouldn't object to. I think it's the public disclosure that creates embarrassment."

7:22
Sam Roberts, on the commuter tax: "Do you have regrets about supporting it's repeal?"

Silver: "We are one state, and what is good for one state is a combination of factors."

8:30
Roberts: resurrecting the Ravitch Plan?
Silver: "I don't think so…we will do the G.A.A.P. budget piece without the borrowing that was attached to it in the Ravitch Plan."

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Comments [1]

Larry Littlefield

The need to ask the man a couple of questions:

1) What do you think the legacy of your generation of leaders will be for future residents of this state? Will their taxes be higher or lower? Will their public services and benefits be better or worse? With their economic prospects be better or worse?

2) What state have you advised your children to move to? Or are they leaving the country?

Jan. 25 2011 12:20 AM

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