Streams

Shareholders, Corporate Political Donations, and Transparency

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

It's corporate shareholder meeting season, and many groups are calling for more transparency when it comes to corporate political donations.  Thomas DiNapoli, New York State Comptroller, joins us to discuss the issue. Are you a shareholder? What do you want to know about a company's political spending? Let us know!

Guests:

Thomas DiNapoli
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Comments [3]

DSK & a culture of SOFT BRIBES at the IMF ? from PLEASE INVESTIGATE/DISCUSS.

Do companies, govts and investors with business before the IMF regularly provide "soft bribes" to win favor or get INSIDER INFO ? Is DSK's behaviour the tip of the Iceberg ?

Small differences in IMF policy - or even hints providing
INSIDER INFORMATION ahead of public announcements can result in
10s or 100s of Millions of EURO in added profit for individual companies and investors (and possibly govts).

DSK has displayed a long standing policy of accepting "favors"
(in this case in the form of invitations to paid sex parties).

Is this the TIP OF THE ICEBERG ?

Do companies and investors with business before the IMF (or
who hope to win advance insider information/tips) routinely
offer "soft bribes" to IMF and ECB officials ?
Even during imposed AUSTERITY ?

Small differences in IMF policy - or hints providing INSIDER INFORMATION ahead of public announcements can result in 100Ms of EURO in added profit for individual companies & investors (& possibly govts).

DSK seems to accept "favors" (in this case in the form of invitations to paid sex parties).

Is this the TIP OF THE ICEBERG ?

Do COs & investors w business before the IMF (or
who want TIPS) routinely offer "soft bribes" to IMF and ECB officials ?
Even during imposed AUSTERITY ?

Mar. 27 2012 09:50 PM
MSNY from NYC

I recently retired from an executive position at a major US corporation. Every year people at my income level were pressured to contribute to the company's PAC. I received my income from the company but I do not agree with all of the industry's political positions. I also believe that political activity does not belong in the workplace. Yet, I was concerned each year that my lack of contributions to the PAC would influence my mobility at my job. I do not believe it did, but the concern was there all the same.

Mar. 27 2012 10:56 AM

How about lobbying spending?

Mar. 27 2012 10:55 AM

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