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New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid has died in Syria

Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 09:47 PM

New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid died on Thursday while working in Syria, reporting on the growing conflict there. He was a frequent guest on the Lopate Show, shedding light on the politics and conflict in countries across the Middle East, including Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, and Syria. He died at the age of 43. You can listen to some of Anthony Shadid's conversations with Leonard over the years:

September 2005, discussing his book about Iraq, Night Draws Near

July 2006, reporting from Tyre, Lebanon - an interview that was cut short because of a nearby explosion

August 2006 update from Tyre, Lebanon

March 2010 look at Iraq's upcoming parliamentary elections

April 2011 interview about his capture while covering the unrest in Libya

April 2011 update on the government crackdown in Syria

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Comments [1]

David G. Herrmann from New York, NY, USA

This is a tragic loss. I never met Mr. Shadid, but felt as if I knew him because of his constant and important contributions to both broadcast and print news throughout his distinguished career.

Mr. Shadid was notable for his warmth and compassion, even as he reported with clear eyes on disastrous and saddening events. He was astonishingly resilient after his abduction together with colleagues. He was six years younger than I am.

To those close to him, I wish consolation.

With all the rest of us, I regret the loss to news reporting in our time,

David G. Herrmann

Feb. 17 2012 07:17 PM

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The Lodown is a blog about everything brought to you by the staff of the Leonard Lopate Show (Leonard will even drop by from time to time)! We cover food, art, politics, history, science and much more -- literally everything from Picasso to pork pies. Tips and suggestions are welcome so please send us your thoughts, curiosities and intellectual detritus!

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