Streams

StoryCorps Love Stories

Monday, February 13, 2012

Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps and author of All There Is: Love Stories from StoryCorps, returns for Valentine's Day with more storiesĀ from the oral history project StoryCorps.

This Wednesday, join Leonard Lopate for An Evening with Dave Isay to discuss his new book.

Guests:

Dave Isay
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Comments [4]

jennifer from new brunswick

love, like dieting is a constant struggle, or as i like to say
love is a many splenda thing. ;0)

Feb. 14 2012 06:43 AM
What about stories from people who are alone ? from This is a BIAS in StroyCorps


There's a bias in story-corps. You require people
to be in pairs. This treats the life stories of
people who are alone as being somehow unworthy
of being told.

Not only does this bias your findings, it is
dismissive of people who - if anything - may
have a greater need to tell their story to
someone.

It also limits the types of stories you will
tend to hear - placing an artificial slant to
your stories. You will hear fewer stories of
isolation, defeat, severe loss, sacrifice for principle,
betrayal, dedication to important isolated pursuits,
long journeys which may or may not have worked
out well, transition with a hope for renewal,
broken dreams and hopes, commitment to community or
to God or some other higher purpose which may
make one's journey solitary but not lonely.
Often these sorts of stories are by far the most
interesting and compelling. They may be far
more unusual, original and authentic. Furthermore,
offering the chance to a person who has noone else
to tell his/her story and have it heard
is often a greater and more needed kindness.

(I'd also add that even for people involved in
long term relationship, the presence of a particular
person who they know in the booth is likely to distort
the story that is told. People will tend to try to
emphasize actions and thoughts which make them seem
better in their partner's eyes (or at least not
egregiously worse), and which may emphasize the strength
of their relationship. Presumably, most people wouldn't
for example tell you the story of their long term affairs
and how meaningful it was to them in the presence of their
spouse. No doubt there are many other less common stories
which you are also missing because of this requirement).

You should expand the story corp to allow INDIVIDUALS
to tell their story.

Feb. 13 2012 12:29 PM
Robert from NYC

And? And? What? I have to say I used to enjoy the whole Story Corps thing but the constant presentation of it on NPR has just turned me off to the whole thing. It's become burdensome to listen to when it's just dropped on you. It's like carpal tunnel syndrome. It's become sort of like yentaism taken to its extreme. [deep breath]

Feb. 13 2012 10:55 AM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

The notion of a man wooing a woman beyond the first rejection nowadays is just about extinct. Any man who tried to pursue a woman beyond that is likely to be labeled a stalker. And can you spell "sexual harassment"? Merely the fear of being labeled so is enough to prevent these types of wonderful stories from happening nearly as often as they once did.

Feb. 13 2012 10:52 AM

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