Streams

State of Manhattan

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

Scott Stringer, Manhattan Borough President, talks about some of his ideas for tax policy and small business assistance in his recent State of the Borough address.

Guests:

Scott M. Stringer
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Comments [7]

Helen from manhattan

its a little disingenuous to hear how he wants to give those making $300,000 a tax cut to help them "pay for groceries" while those tax breaks are just going to cause layoffs, mta fare hikes, etc that only hurt those who truly can't afford them. Only in New York are people so elitist and so out of touch that they can say that people making that kind of money are "suffering".

Feb. 07 2012 10:51 AM

the city with the highest rents...NYC and SF...cities vying to be the most progressive...NYC and SF...when the gvt gets involved we all suffer

Feb. 07 2012 10:46 AM
Jim Sparks from Manhattan

Stringer's proposal is absurd. Someone making $200,000 per year doesn't need an extra car payment or bag of groceries, they need relief from property taxes that have gone up 130% in the last six years.

Feb. 07 2012 10:39 AM
Sara from Bushwick

....and that would be the perfect amount for a campaign contribution.

Feb. 07 2012 10:39 AM
Sheldon from Brooklyn

Why doesn't Stringer also propose cutting spending. He can't do that, he a typical establishment Democrat.

Feb. 07 2012 10:37 AM
Michelle from nyc

What does Stringer propose for affordable housing? A key foundation to having a middle class in NYC.

Are are his specific proposals?? Not just stating the obvious. How would he achieve this goal?

Feb. 07 2012 10:37 AM
Sara from Bushwick

200-300 thousand dollars a year would be a dream - a $300 tax break is nothing if someone makes that much. Get serious!

Feb. 07 2012 10:36 AM

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