Streams

Wael Ghonim on Revolution (2.0)

Monday, February 06, 2012

Wael Ghonim, Egyptian pro-democracy activist, administrator of the Facebook page "We are all Khaled Saeed," former Google executive, and author of Revolution 2.0: The Power of the People Is Greater Than the People in Power: A Memoir, reflects on the Egyptian revolution and what his role and the role of social media was in the uprising, as well as news from Egypt now.

Guests:

Wael Ghonim
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Comments [11]

tony from bayside

I hear ya John, I know you mentioned wbai earlier and a lot of their shows are first rate;
Talk-Back! Explorations, Non-fiction, Behind the news...
I love wnyc but as good as their morning lineup is it's just a glaring fact...

Feb. 06 2012 01:06 PM

when is wnyc going to take bloomberg and kelly and the forever lying spokesman for the nypd to task for forcibly placing the media and citizens media in a pen 2 blocks away from Zuccati park and stopping Freedom of the press.
Amazingly WNYC talks of these freedoms being won in egypt, yet turns a blind eye to its own backyard. The anti OWS NYPD spokesman lies that WNYC transmitted verbatim without question, was a disservice to the citizens. The citizen media did a better job than the "bought" media. When NYPD did the same thing with the recent anti-Muslim NYPD training film, they had enough weight to cause a fact checking movement and piece by piece everything Kelly and Brown stated turned out to be pure lies, that they stuck to inspite of being called on it.Hopefully the calls for resignation will grow legs, and with the OWS denial of freedom of the press, turn into actual federal charges.
Meanwhile WNYC has shows on egypt, which was great and very interesting and insiteful,however they are guilty of turning a blind eye to their own backyard when Web 2.0 was working here too.

Feb. 06 2012 12:43 PM
john from office

I rather have quality rather than diversity. Smiley and west is about it for me. The programing here is 1st rate, I dont want third rate in the interest of favoring diversity.

Feb. 06 2012 12:32 PM
tony from bayside

ha, thanks for the tip John, however what about what I said? Is it not worth a discussion? Just go over there!

Feb. 06 2012 11:44 AM
Amy from Manhattan

Topgyal, it may have more to do w/China's position in the world--taking a position against the Chinese gov't. is much harder than opposing the (former) Egyptian gov't. Tibet is 1 of the many reasons I avoid buying Chinese products (to the extent I can), but I'm sure it doesn't make enough of a difference.

Feb. 06 2012 11:41 AM
john from office

Tony from bayside Go to WBAI, that is more your speed

Feb. 06 2012 11:35 AM
Nick from NJ

Truly awesome guest! Hopefully a future President of Egypt!

Feb. 06 2012 11:35 AM
Amy from Manhattan

I'm glad to hear Wael Ghonim say that activism on the ground is as important as activism through social media, because 1 thing that really impressed me was that some of the people who were communicating online also went door to door in neighborhoods where people didn't have access to the Internet to tell them what was happening & encourage them to come to the demonstrations.

Feb. 06 2012 11:31 AM
tony from bayside

Make sure your model is NPR and not WNYC in terms of a good representation of the population for the hosts. WNYC is not supposed to be like the FDNY in terms of diversity…sorry but it's true.

Feb. 06 2012 11:27 AM
Amy from Manhattan

I heard that the reason so few women were elected to Egypt's upper house of parliament was that the female candidates were all at the end of the lists on the ballots. Is this something that was below the radar of the activists? Can they mobilize to prevent the same thing from happening in the upcoming elections for the lower house?

Feb. 06 2012 11:26 AM
Topgyal

Why is it not possible in Tibet? So far over 19 Tibetans have self immolated in protest and yet the world stands indifferent. Is it because Tibet does not have oil to offer?

Feb. 06 2012 11:15 AM

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