Streams

Stephen Fry

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Stephen Fry tells about arriving at Cambridge University as a convicted fraudster and thief, an addict, liar, fantasist, and failed suicide, convinced he would be sent away. Instead, he befriended bright young things like Emma Thompson and Hugh Laurie, and emerged as one of the most promising comic talents in the world. The Fry Chronicles  is his story of his journey to stardom.

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Stephen Fry
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Comments [5]

Tony

anyone know the name of the music intro to the steven fry podcast segment? soundhound identifies it as ''sparcklin'' by barney wilen ... but after listening to a sample of ''spracklin'' track i dbelieve that is incorrect.

Jan. 27 2012 02:11 PM
anonyme

I always thought Stephen Fry would make the perfect Ignatius Reilly in A Confederacy of Dunces, one of the funniest books I have ever read - I think Drew Barrymore has the rights. :)

Jan. 24 2012 05:07 PM
Ed from Larchmont

It's interesting how someone who has so much would turn to drugs at times and even think of suicide. People want more than this world can offer.

Jan. 24 2012 01:54 PM
Elaine from Baltimore

I really enjoyed Mr. Fry's show "Kingdom" and was sadden to see it canceled. The characters were pleasantly quirky although the main musical theme seemed a tad too grandiose!

Jan. 24 2012 01:48 PM
stuart from manhattan

Reading the first chapter on line, I realize that Mr Fry and my 7 year old daughter both have a fondness for Sugar Puffs (sweetened puffed rice cold cereal). My daughter would rather have a bowl of Sugar Puffs (any brand will do - even the generic store brand) instead of whatever is for dinner (steak, lo mein, pasta, chicken, etc). Is there a cure for this obsession?

Jan. 24 2012 12:02 PM

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