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Mystery and History

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Monday, January 09, 2012

Double-headed serpent (Trustees of the British Museum)

Double-blind clinical trials are the current medical standard, but could they be damaging the chances for patients in dire need of getting treatments? We’ll look at the potential dangers of relying on clinical trials that involve placebos. Graphic designer Bob Gill talks about his colorful career. Swedish crime thriller writers Arne Dahl, Anders Roslund, and Borge Hellstrom discuss their work and the growing popularity of Scandinavian mystery writing. Plus, Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, gives us a preview of a celebrated BBC series that we’ll be running on our show—The History of the World in 100 Objects!

Placebos and Clinical Trials

Beryl Lieff Benderly discusses the potential dangers of relying on double-blind clinical trials, which she sees as damaging the chances for patients in dire need of getting treatments. She also talks about why she thinks too many researchers are looking at what placebos aren't doing, as opposed to what they are. Her latest article, "Head Games," is in the current issue of Miller-McCune.

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Bob Gill, So Far

Bob Gill talks about his 60-year career in graphic design, from his first revolutionary designs and illustrations of the early 1960s to the design of his recent children's books. One of the founders in 1962 of the legendary design studio Fletcher/Forbes/Gill (forerunner of today's Pentagram studio), Gill went on to found the Designers and Art Directors Association (D&AD). His book Bob Gill, So Far is a collection of his work.

 

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Swedish Crime Fiction

Swedish crime thriller writers Arne Dahl, Anders Roslund, and Borge Hellstrom discuss their work and the specific culture of Scandinavian mystery writing. Dahl talks about Misterioso, the first novel in his Intercrime series, which follows Detective Paul Hjelm in the suburbs of Stockholm. Roslund and Hellstrom, are the authors of Three Seconds and Cell 8, both about Detective Superintendent Ewert Grens.

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A History of the World in 100 Objects

Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, talks about selecting100 man-made artifacts that each provide an intimate glimpse of an important turning point in human civilization. The 100-episode BBC series A History of the World in 100 Objects, and its companion book, A History of the World in 100 Objects, stretches back two million years and covers the globe. From the very first hand axe to the ubiquitous credit card, each item tells a story, and together they relate the larger history of mankind.

Starting Tuesday, January 10, the Leonard Lopate Show will be airing the BBC series A History of the World in 100 Objects, an object a day for 100 days.

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