Streams

Stanford Abruptly Drops Bid to Develop City Campus

Friday, December 16, 2011

Stanford University, which was considered a leading contender in the competition to build an applied sciences campus in New York City, has withdrawn its application, less than a month before the winner was to be announced.

Stanford University, which was considered a leading contender in the competition to build an applied sciences campus in New York City, has withdrawn its bid less than a month before the winner was to be announced.
A statement from the university said Stanford's trustees decided to cancel the bid after weeks of negotiations with city officials.
The carefully-worded press release does not go into specifics, but says "the university could not be certain that it could proceed in a way that ensured the success of the campus."
Stanford did not immediately respond to a request seeking further clarification. Nor did the city's Economic Development Corporation, which is spearheading the effort to develop a major new center for scientific research and development in the five boroughs.

A statement from the university said Stanford's trustees decided to cancel the bid after weeks of negotiations with city officials.

The carefully-worded press release did not go into specifics, but stated "the university could not be certain that it could proceed in a way that ensured the success of the campus."

Julie Wood, deputy press secretary for Mayor Michael Bloomberg, remained upbeat about the project. "This competition is about changing the future of the City’s economy, and we are thrilled that we have a number of proposals that we believe will do exactly that. We are in serious negotiations with several of the other applicants, each of whom has a game-changing project queued up. We look forward to announcing a winner soon. We thank Stanford for participating in our process and wish them good luck."

Stanford planned to spend $2.5 million building a glittering 1.8 million square foot housing and academic space at the southern tip of Roosevelt Island, to accommodate 2,200 students. Stanford made its bid in partnership with the City University of New York (CUNY). Calls to CUNY about how Stanford’s decision will impact its plans to move forward were not returned.

Stanford did not immediately respond to a request seeking clarification on its differences with New York City officials. The Mayor’s office also did not share details.

Stanford’s move may give a boost to another leading competitor: Cornell University, which is making a joint bid with Israel’s Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.

Hours after Stanford publicized its decision, Cornell announced its largest-ever gift from an anonymous donor: $350 million, to be used to develop Cornell’s proposed campus if it is the winner.

Reached by phone, CUNY trustee Jeffrey Wiesenfeld was quick to endorse the Cornell-Technion team.

“Technion is the MIT of Israel and it operates on the same level. All the tech coming out of Israel comes from there. If it wasn’t for Israel, there'd be no cell phones,” Wiesenfeld said, conceding that Stanford’s withdrawal would likely end CUNY’s role in the competition.

“It would be nice to have Stanford but I’m not going to go and lament it,” he said.

There are still six academic consortia vying for the opportunity to build a engineering and applied sciences campus in the city, including institutions such as New York University, Columbia and Carnegie Mellon University.

Tags:

More in:

Comments [1]

Barbara Pryor from

Our wonderful CUNY should be first in line to
develop this project and benefit from it. The City and State should be funding CUNY for this and not courting out of state institutions.

Dec. 16 2011 10:37 PM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Sponsored

Latest Newscast

 

 

Support

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public

Feeds

Supported by