Streams

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn on NYC’s Food System

Friday, December 16, 2011

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn gives an update of FoodWorks: A Vision to Improve NYC’s Food System report, issued a year ago by the New York City Council. The report examined agricultural production, processing, distribution, consumption and post-consumption of food in New York, and proposes 60 strategic actions to improve health, community, and economic development and sustainability. She's joined by Rob Behnke, CEO and Founder of The Brooklyn Salsa Company, which has designated funds to aid cooperative farmland is taking strides towards Carbon Neutrality, has also teamed up with Community Gardeners, Local CSAs, and Public Schools to transform the rooftops, compostable landfills, backyards, empty lots, cement parks and into a urban farmland.

Guests:

Rob Behnke and Christine Quinn
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Comments [14]

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/slush_fund_hangover_vdeOps2zPN4vDgHUQO1FLK

Hey Leonard -
They only thing that has changed since last year is the hands where the kickbacks and graft money reside. You can be sure that the avaricious queen Christine will continue to plunder the city's treasury so long as her fawning sycophants, such as yourself and your station, fail to hold her accountable for her depredations.

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/slush_fund_hangover_vdeOps2zPN4vDgHUQO1FLK

Dec. 16 2011 05:37 PM
Ellen from Washington Heights

Composting can be done in the 600 local NYC community gardens and urban farms,

This could be done with a very small amount of money could be spent on

1. youth jobs to learn about and manage the compost systems and keep the gardens open to accept compostables.

2. integrated pest management of rat prevention in gardens who want to compost but are not getting this support from the city.

Also, innovative food waste mitigation through Bokashi Composting, Outdoor Worm Bins and other systems should be supported and taught.

The above would be much better than the current forays that the City has done recently on a small scale. Sending autumn leaves to landfills and picking up food waste by private haulers, these are the very truck drivers that consistently kill pedestrians and cyclists because of their unsafe driving conditions and toxic fumes.

More money spent on

Dec. 16 2011 12:33 PM
shc from Brooklyn

I'm in the building industry and there are many groups who are interested in incorporating green roofs into their projects, whether it is new or existing. One major hurdle, however (aside from legislative codes and such - kudos to the city on the newest green codes), is the lack of infrastructure for organic waste. If the city could figure out and establish a composting infrastructure, and not just for household scraps, this could advance NYC's green footprint by leagues!!

Dec. 16 2011 12:30 PM
john from office

What does"of color" mean please??? So if a person of "no color" applied they will be turned away??

Are there "of color" stores??

please explain

Dec. 16 2011 12:26 PM
Amy from Manhattan

I've seen Brooklyn Salsa in natural food stores, & once when it was on sale I bought a jar of the Brooklyn flavor. It really was hot! I like that, & if I find it at a reasonable price again, I'll buy more. But your Manhattan flavor is mild? If that's what you think, you don't really know Manhattan. And you call it "The Pure"?? Pure *what*?

Dec. 16 2011 12:25 PM
Henrietta from Nyc

Why is there no Master Gardener program in NYC? This would give us more opportunities for food education & community service.

Dec. 16 2011 12:23 PM
Sophie from Poughkeepsie, NY

Christine Quinn needs to learn how to modulate her voice. She ALWAYS sounds like she's screaming or ready to scream. How aggravating it is to listen to her on the radio. Take some voice lessons dammit! I'm tuning out for this segment.

Dec. 16 2011 12:21 PM
john from office

Unfortunatly, poor areas are targetted for the high carb, low food value foods. These are cheap to buy and come in large amounts. I have seen people buy candy and soda with their EBT cards.

Dec. 16 2011 12:20 PM
Paul from Jersey City

The guests seem to be talking as if "local"="New York State" when most of New Jersey is closer to NYC than most of NYS.

Aren't Jersey tomatoes local?

Dec. 16 2011 12:20 PM
Aaron from Brooklyn

Does freezing all of those tons of local tomatoes for the brooklyn salsa negate the environmental benefits of being local?

Dec. 16 2011 12:19 PM
anon

Are you kidding me? Brooklyn Salsa? I know these guys and they're a hipster joke. And the salsa is disgusting. I can't believe I'm hearing this on wnyc.

Dec. 16 2011 12:18 PM
Erin from Brooklyn

New York City receives billions of dollars in Food Stamp allotments each year, only $500,000 where redeemed at green market in 2010. Markets are great but they create food access for a few hours one day a week---is this really a tool for increasing access? The scale of this is tiny, the problem is huge. 5 supermarkets, a few farmers markets, we need to be thinking bigger--how? What policy tools do we have to accomplish this?

Dec. 16 2011 12:16 PM
Susan from Upper West Side

I would love to talk to Christin Quinn about some early interventions for infants that may complement interventions for children. I see the roots of obesity occurring much earlier -- in three to six month olds. Assisting low income women to breastfeed and if they cannot fully breastfeed, formula feed like breastfeeders would certainly help. Breastmilk is the freshest greenest food out there. Unfortunately, many mothers even at higher incomes fall into the mode of overstuffing their babies with bottles (breastmilk or formula). I've been seeing clearcut patterns in my clinical data of babies who are fed huge amount infrequently, initially growing poorly because they dribble or vomit it back up. Later they become overweight once their stomachs have been stretched out. The worst I ever heard was a mother who fed her baby 18 ounces of formula before bed.

Dec. 16 2011 12:13 PM

Slightly off topic but:

In this season where hundreds are facing layoffs and thousands are lacking the money to properly feed their children, how much has had to be allocated for the legal representation provided to speaker Quinn for her participation in the city counsel embezzlement of City money that was allocated to non-existent agencies for later, surreptitious disbursement to council members in the speakers favor?
Does the speaker still have such legal representation? Does she have any estimation as to when the U.S. Assistant Attorney General will be concluding his investigation?

Dec. 16 2011 10:12 AM

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