The Landmarks of New York

There are so many buildings, bridges, and places to love in this city. Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel discusses the definitive resource on the architectural history of New York City, The Landmarks of New York: An Illustrated Record of the City's Historic Buildings, Fifth Edition, which documents and illustrates the 1,276 individual landmarks and 102 historic districts that have been given landmark status by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission—from colonial farmhouses to Gilded Age mansions to schools and libraries to the city’s soaring skyscrapers.

Tell us what your favorite New York landmark is and why! Leave a comment below.

 

8 Thomas Street, 1875–76. Manhattan
8 Thomas Street, 1875–76. Manhattan

Architect: Jarvis Morgan Slade. Designated: November 14, 1978

( Max Becher and Andrea Robbins )
IRT Subway System Stations, 1901–08. Manhattan
IRT Subway System Stations, 1901–08. Manhattan

Architects: Heins & La Farge. Interiors designated: October 23, 1979

( Andrew Bordwin )
Green-Wood Cemetery Gates, including attached Comfort Station and Office, 1861–65; 1996. Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Brooklyn
Green-Wood Cemetery Gates, including attached Comfort Station and Office, 1861–65; 1996. Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Brooklyn

Architect: Richard Upjohn & Son. Designated: April 19, 1966

( Laura Napier )
Al Hirschfeld Theater, formerly Martin Beck Theater, 1923–24. 302–314 West 45th Street, Manhattan
Al Hirschfeld Theater, formerly Martin Beck Theater, 1923–24. 302–314 West 45th Street, Manhattan

Architect: C. Albert Lansburgh. Designated (exterior and interior): November 4, 1987

( Carin Drechsler-Marx )
Al Hirschfeld Theater, formerly Martin Beck Theater, 1923–24. 302–314 West 45th Street, Manhattan
Al Hirschfeld Theater, formerly Martin Beck Theater, 1923–24. 302–314 West 45th Street, Manhattan

Architect: C. Albert Lansburgh. Designated (exterior and interior): November 4, 1987

( Carin Drechsler-Marx )
McGovern-Weir Greenhouse, formerly Weir Greenhouse, 1895. Southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Brooklyn
McGovern-Weir Greenhouse, formerly Weir Greenhouse, 1895. Southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Brooklyn

Architect: G. Curtis Gillespie. Designated: April 13, 1982

( Andrew Garn )
New York City Parking Violations Bureau, formerly the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank Building, 1909–12. 51 Chambers Street, Manhattan
New York City Parking Violations Bureau, formerly the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank Building, 1909–12. 51 Chambers Street, Manhattan

Architect: Raymond F. Almirall. Designated (exterior and interior): July 9, 1985

( Max Becher and Andrea Robbins )
Watchtower, 1855. Marcus Garvey Park, opposite East 122nd Street, Manhattan
Watchtower, 1855. Marcus Garvey Park, opposite East 122nd Street, Manhattan

Architect: Attributed to Julius Kroehl. Designated: July 12, 1967

( Stephen Fischer )
The Wonder Wheel, 1918–20. 3059 West 12th Street, Brooklyn
The Wonder Wheel, 1918–20. 3059 West 12th Street, Brooklyn

Inventor: Charles Herman; manufactured and built by the Eccentric Ferris Wheel Amusement Company. Designated: May 23, 1989

( Richard Cappelluti )
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