Streams

Art School in Brief

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Kit White, artist and professor of painting at Brooklyn's Pratt Institute, offers a quick and dirty art school education, from "1. Art can be anything," to "101. Not every art school graduate becomes a successful artist." White is also the author of 101 Things to Learn in Art School

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Kit White
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Comments [19]

anpnyme

Woefully, our culture just doesn't value art except as some kind of vehicle - very little communication between the realms of artists and those of the more industrialized. Leaves one feeling so pointless and undervalued - not great if you start making art because everything else seems pointless and you want to see the point!!! (LOL) I have never been clear on what comes of identification with the "artist" stripe but I am glad I experienced art school and was left with a pretty open mind (which can also be a lonely place). I think Europe is less brutal for artists.

Nov. 29 2011 12:09 PM
Michelle Kamhi from NYC

If "art can be anything," then it is nothing---as I have long argued <http://www.aristos.org> and will further argue in a forthcoming book.

Nov. 29 2011 12:02 PM
Tim

Art and history are essentially one and the same ... in retrospect, we see what may have been artless objects as artful: the mere fact that they survive as objects or ideas is the crucial thing.

Nov. 29 2011 11:58 AM
Christine from Yorktown

This is great to hear: I was an art major and artist who went into corporate work (for better pay) and many colleagues are surprised to find I have an art degree. But as your guest is suggesting, I am very creative and a good problem solver (and I like to do more artist work at home on the weekends as a break from the corporate world.)

Nov. 29 2011 11:58 AM
Iguanaluv from Brooklyn, NY

Art school is fun and broadens your horizon but don't expect to end up being an artist -- not unless you expect to be completely broke for a VERY long time... Maybe forever. Art is a truly passion & only the EXTREMELY dedicated, patient & truly talented can turn it into a paying career.
From,
A Parson School of Design Graduate not working in the arts but with the law :)

Nov. 29 2011 11:57 AM
Christine from Yorktown

This is great to hear: I was an art major and artist who went into corporate work (for better pay) and many colleagues are surprised to find I have an art degree. But as your guest is suggesting, I am very creative and a good problem solver (and I like to do more artist work at home on the weekends as a break from the corporate world.)

Nov. 29 2011 11:56 AM

... not all about ego???

Wha???

As someone whose been in the business for 30 years I can tell you it is ONLY about the all important ego!!

C'mon a little critical discussion, here.

Enough of the sappy romanticism!

Nov. 29 2011 11:56 AM
Jeje

Tips breaking into / back doors to art net??

Nov. 29 2011 11:56 AM
Deirdre E. Kennedy from Jersey City

food is nice to eat.

Nov. 29 2011 11:55 AM
Melinda from New York, NY

If art is descriptive of the world, how is that not a representation?

I am a conceptual artist and I find that my work is always representational of something.

Nov. 29 2011 11:53 AM
Danielle from Washington Heights

A creative act is going to take as long as it takes. Meeting homework deadlines in art school were often frustrating. You could decide to spend 10 hours studying for a history test and know that the time investment would pay off in a good grade. But a painting is a wild card. It's done when it's done, no sooner, no later. A good life lesson.

Nov. 29 2011 11:52 AM
suzinne from Bronx

I went to the Art Student's League for three years but have learned so much more on my own.

Art School is invaluable, but the artistic process is something the artist has to discover on his own.

Nov. 29 2011 11:50 AM

learned how not to make a living, resulting in staying in a crappy retail job for many years.

Nov. 29 2011 11:47 AM
david from work in midtown manhattan (in a non-arts field)

I learned
1) the necessity of working in other media besides my primary interest (i.e., printmaking); by applying different techniques and expanding my skill set I was aided in my primary medium
2) that taking breaks is helpful in everything I do
3) to read the fine print about loan agreements (but only much too late)

Nov. 29 2011 11:40 AM
Inquisigal from Brooklyn

Be able to calmly accept constructive criticism, and use that feedback to look at your work from a more objective perspective, and hone your skills and your vision. That said, be able recognize when someone else's subjective perspective, and life experiences, can negatively effect THEIR ability to view something you've put forth. Recognize human psychology so that you can make work in a smart and empathetic way.

This helps so much, in all industries, and in personal relationships, later in life!

Nov. 29 2011 11:37 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

It's a cliche but: Learn the rules and then proceed to break them

Nov. 29 2011 11:34 AM
Brain from Longest island east of wnyc

Inspiring...For I was told over and over to find my place in art, my skill, my own style and to chose one medium to concentrate on! This was in 1996-1999...In a foundation program I loved all the offerings, be it painting, sculpting, photography, digital art, etc.. Every teacher begged for me to choose a style and medium, understanding now it was to perfect someone's talent. But, Now being a father of two beautiful boys and a teacher in my own right, why would you want to pigeon hole the creative mind and focus on one path? Funny but besides art I learned a life lesson that stays with me until this day. Amazing program and station wnyc, thank you for everything.

Nov. 29 2011 11:27 AM
Rob

If "art can be anything" why do we need art schools at all? I got an MFA. Anyone who would sign a student loan got in, and they never, to my knowledge, failed a single student. Even the most successful painters in the world don't make enough to pay back what most MFAs owe. It may well be one of the most blatant scams out there.

Nov. 29 2011 10:13 AM
asdf

you

r

a

brand.

not a gimmick but an exercise, makes your work better

Nov. 29 2011 10:03 AM

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