Streams

NJ Given $5M Grant for Sustainable Projects

Monday, November 21, 2011

New Jersey has received a $5 million federal grant to create sustainable projects that promote more public transit, green jobs and less reliance on car transportation in low-income and under-served communities.

Shaun Donovan, the U.S. Secretary for Housing and Urban Development, announced the grant Monday in New Brunswick, N.J., at Rutgers University, which will coordinate the planning effort. The grant has been matched by a consortium of statewide groups, bringing the total spending for planning these projects to $10 million.

“This grant will help our region—an area that is rapidly approaching build-out—take the next step in sustainability planning,” said Jon Carnegie, project coordinator for the consortium and executive director of the Bloustein School’s Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center.

The grant focuses on helping low-income, minority and other under-served communities plan developments that boost local economies. For example, a typical project might be a neighborhood revitalization project built around a transit hub, or a program that creates green jobs, according to Carnegie.

The planning project will take three years, and involve communities in 13 counties in northern New Jersey. Carnegie said special emphasis will be placed on the cities of Newark, Paterson, Elizabeth, Jersey City and New Brunswick, which have high concentrations of poverty and communities that are often left out of the planning process.

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