Streams

Trending Topics in Psychotherapy: Stagnation

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Nando Pelusi, contributing editor to Psychology Today magazine and a licensed clinical psychologist with a private practice in NewYork City, visits weekly to talk therapy. This week: feeling stuck in a job, relationship or residence.

Guests:

Nando Pelusi

Comments [16]

CYnthia from The Pits

In response to what that guy said. I learned my lesson. You won't see me running to burning towers ever again. My bad.

"A "psychoanalyst" who claims that a client is never at fault, and that it all has to be the fault of an inherently evil capitalist system is clearly nuts. Of course people make decisions that often work against them. If someone decides to buy a home or a car, but does not have the money to pay for all of it, and then takes out a loan, and finds out a few decades later they can no longer repay, who's fault is it? Is it the fault of the lender, the borrower, the "system?" IF people choose to divorce, and suddenly they cannot afford two homes, whose fault is it? People are responsible for making poor or risky decisions, and should stop blaming "the system."

Nov. 17 2011 11:23 AM
Alex from NYC

Cynthia,

Thank you. Here's to the substance that sometimes emerges from the vapors! And here's to solidarity.

Wishing you the best at OWS and all points in between,

Alex

Nov. 17 2011 11:20 AM
Cynthia from Manhattan

Alex,

We crossed in the vapors. I was logging back to say: "what Alex said." ;-)

Poor Brian.

Nov. 17 2011 11:13 AM
Lee from NYC

Jgarbuz from Queens, you miss the point entirely. Reflect much?

Nov. 17 2011 11:13 AM
Alex from NYC

To Jean Lehrman from Brooklyn and to Cynthia--

Thanks for your insightful points. I was so heartened to read them here.

Nov. 17 2011 11:10 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

A "psychoanalyst" who claims that a client is never at fault, and that it all has to be the fault of an inherently evil capitalist system is clearly nuts. Of course people make decisions that often work against them. If someone decides to buy a home or a car, but does not have the money to pay for all of it, and then takes out a loan, and finds out a few decades later they can no longer repay, who's fault is it? Is it the fault of the lender, the borrower, the "system?" IF people choose to divorce, and suddenly they cannot afford two homes, whose fault is it? People are responsible for making poor or risky decisions, and should stop blaming "the system."

Nov. 17 2011 11:09 AM
janet from New York

@ jgarbuz from Queens
It sounds like no matter how little money you've had, you've had a sense of family and community. Its commendable that you can live with so little, but I think you are a bit out of touch with the current state of many people's lives. People are disenfranchised, they don't have family, they don't have community AND they either don't have or are worried about losing the ability to provide food and shelter for themselves. There is a sense of hopelessness to life, not just a worry that we won't be able to purchase a new car, new home etc.....

Nov. 17 2011 11:09 AM
Alex from NYC

To Brian and his producers: PLEASE consider broadening your understanding of the psychotherapeutic field. For example, a relational cultural therapist (google that or the Jean Baker Miller Institute) would not attempt to pathologize those individual callers who note the complex connection between emotions and external political-cultural factors. To tout the outdated psycho-byte "your political analysis reflects your personal emotions" as the only or primary connection between the economic and cultural challenges that so many are grappling with these days one the one hand, and our emotions and psyches on the other, is horribly reductive and simply wrong. It's embarrassing that you've wheeled out this cognitive-behaviorally oriented therapist as somehow emblematic of what therapy is and what's "trending" (cringe-worthy diction and a telling choice on your part!) in therapy right now. Please broaden your understanding and your guest-ship! Please.

Nov. 17 2011 11:06 AM
David from Washington Heights

Dr. Pulosi, the life coach, brings a breath of California to our city. He says that politics is ultimately a matter of feelings. It made me imagine a life coach at Auschwitz: "How does that make you feel?," he would ask as we were being herded into the gas chambers.

Nov. 17 2011 11:04 AM
Jay

This Segment was for the Rush Limbaugh Prog
OWS needs a lot of help in many ways!!! Ha Ha Ha!! OWS would be great for SNL.
Many thing I agree with OWS we shouldn't be bailing out wall st or any bank and helping our country but they are at the wrong place go occupy the Congress the white house etc... They did the bail out!!

Nov. 17 2011 11:02 AM
cynthia from Heading to OWS Methinks

Hey I'm seeing past my wall and I see a guest who should have been dragged off by hook. LOL!

Send me your paralyzed.

Hi. I'm paralyzed.

Well snap out of it!

Nov. 17 2011 11:02 AM
jean lehrman from brooklyn

as a psychoanalyst myself, i find the guest's
comments offensive. people are HELPED by understanding that their situations are NOT THEIR FAULT, but the fault of a political system based on greed. at that point they are often able to move on with increased self-esteem. instead of depression, they may feel anger of the sort which leads to activism, or they may simply "come unstuck" as it is self-blame and self-hatred which cause paralysis.

Nov. 17 2011 11:00 AM
Robert from NYC

Yes, go speak with a therapist and heat his/her swimming pool, lol. We're surrounded by them.

Nov. 17 2011 10:56 AM
Robert from NYC

Be done with it, do acid!

Nov. 17 2011 10:55 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

Reality is a hard thing for many people to swallow. It can be traumatic. Americans were taught to move around, get a Chevrolet and see the USA, etc. After the Holocaust, when my parents and I made it alive to America in 1949, we were grateful to live in rat infested tenement in Brooklyn. WE were even more grateful to get into the new housing projects a few years thereafter.
To me, having one's health, a roof over one's head, a little food, and hot water for a shower is more than enough. Everything beyond that is a luxury. Too many Americans have forgotten the basics. They are traumatized because they might have to live in a small apartment instead of a McMansion.

Nov. 17 2011 10:52 AM
fuva from Harlemworld

Brian, the SOCIAL mobility rate is pretty much stagnant too.

Nov. 17 2011 10:49 AM

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