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Look | Protesters Return to Occupy Zuccotti Park

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

(Spencer Platt/Getty)

Hundreds of protesters returned to Zuccotti Park early Tuesday evening, about an hour after a ruling by Manhattan Supreme Court ruled that they could legally return to the park. Police cleared a path at the north and south ends of the park and a steady stream of protesters filed in to cheers and applause.

Allison Joyce/Getty

The sun rises on Zuccotti Park on November 16, 2011 in New York City. Police had removed the protesters from the park early Tuesday.

Kathleen Horan/WNYC

A sparsely Zuccotti Park, the day after it was cleared of the Occupy Wall Street encampment and cleaned.

Spencer Platt/Getty

An Occupy Wall Street protester empties a container of a tent before he can enter Zuccotti Park a day after it was cleared of the Occupy Wall Street camp.

Alex Goldmark/WNYC

Weary protesters retake Zucotti Park without tents, sleeping bags, tarps or trash cans.

Alex Goldmark/WNYC

Protesters weren't the only ones at the park, private security guards were also present.

Police officers letting protesters back into Zuccotti Park.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Police officers letting protesters back into Zuccotti Park early Tuesday evening.

Protesters chanting in Zuccotti Park after being allowed back in.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Protesters chanting in Zuccotti Park after being allowed back in.

Hundreds of police re-entered Zuccotti Park and were greeted by hundreds of officer and community affairs officers on Tuesday.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Hundreds of police re-entered Zuccotti Park and were greeted by hundreds of officer and community affairs officers on Tuesday.

Members of Code Pink set up a table soon after returning to Zuccotti Park.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Members of Code Pink set up a table soon after returning to Zuccotti Park.

Man reading n + 1's Occupy Wall Street broadsheet in Zuccotti Park after returning on Tuesday, following a court injunction.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Man reading n + 1's Occupy Wall Street broadsheet in Zuccotti Park after returning on Tuesday, following a court injunction.

Officers clearing a path for protesters to enter and leave at the north and south ends of the park, after a judge ruled the Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street protesters could return.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Officers clearing a path for protesters to enter and leave at the north and south ends of the park, after a judge ruled the Zuccotti Park Occupy Wall Street protesters could return.

Occupy Wall Street protesters already back at work creating new signs, after being allowed to return to Zuccotti Park Tuesday evening.
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

Occupy Wall Street protesters already back at work creating new signs, after being allowed to return to Zuccotti Park Tuesday evening.

An officer guarding Zuccotti Park, minutes before protesters flooded back in, Occupy Wall Street
Stephen Nessen/WNYC

An officer guarding Zuccotti Park, minutes before protesters flooded back in.

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Comments [3]

I honestly do not see how OWS is not well organized. You do realize that they organized a GLOBAL protest, uniting people on every continent to stop corporate influence on politics. I can't emphasize that enough... GLOBAL... To say they are not organized is just a display of ignorance and a lack of research. The same applies to not knowing their goals. They are also EMPLOYED, which is why they have cell phones. I think the misunderstanding here is that the people at OWS care about the homeless and have been actively trying to help them on a daily basis, this does not mean that EVERYONE participating is jobless and without means. The blind generalizations of the OWS movement are driving me nuts. These people are trying to help in every way they can and make a better world happen. I don't understand the negativity directed towards them.

Nov. 16 2011 10:54 AM

OWS does not have a "right" to break laws. Better to look towards your doppelganger - the so-called "tea Party".
They are better organized and in control of their narrative. OWS lost control of it's narrative because it was never focused. You should thank the good mayor for pushing you sissies to the brink. In other words "man up", and get a strong message you can focus peoples' attention in a single sound bite. The cute "chanting general assembly" thing is boring, silly and irritating.
Occupy will either die or flourish. As one of the 1% who happens to agree with one of your OWS' core messages, the disparity in wealth, I witnessed stupid suggestions and non-starter, tired ideas like"debt forgiveness", or "abolish property rights" when I visited the Zucotti encampment. Actually, most folks there seemed pretty well off to judge by their attire and tech gadgets, but that's a discussion for another day.

Nov. 16 2011 06:19 AM
Brandt Hardin

The actions today by New York official violated nearly every freedom our Founding Fathers entrusted Americans with. This is a shameful and sad day for our country. Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Assembly are being denied to these protesters. Freedom of Press was even muffled in the early hours of the morning as no reporters or even lawyers for the movement were allowed near the raids. Despite all of this and the abuse endured from Fascist Police Forces country wide, the movement continues even this evening in NYC. Stand tall and voice your opinions with the Occupy group. You can learn more, see political art and get informed at http://dregstudiosart.blogspot.com/2011/09/occupywallstreet.html

Nov. 15 2011 08:27 PM

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