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Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Nathan Myhrvold discusses his massive six-volume, 2,400-page set of books outlining science-inspired techniques for preparing food. Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, written with Chris Young and Maxime Bilet and a 20-person team at The Cooking Lab, outlines how to use tools such as water baths, homogenizers, centrifuges, and ingredients such as hydrocolloids, emulsifiers, and enzymes. It is a collection and a project that attempts to reinvent cooking.

Guests:

Nathan Myhrvold

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Comments [7]

NJ Cher from West Orange, NJ

I was impressed that he wanted to do this enough that he financed it himself. I am exposed to some sophisticated cooking techniques and I heard about many new things that I'd not heard of before.

Nov. 15 2011 05:07 PM
Rev K L J Depue

The topic was interesting . . . but I must admit, it was challenging to listen to Mr. Myhrvold -- he sounded like a ringer for Mo Rocca doing a comedy bit!

Nov. 15 2011 01:33 PM
MichaelB from Morningside Heights

Interesting. Fascinating. The guy is mad!

Nov. 15 2011 01:26 PM
Fred

Enough already! All this endless obsession with food. Who cares?

Nov. 15 2011 01:25 PM
Peter from Park Slope

I'm a sucker for kitchen science, and always enjoy Mr. Myhrvold's comments, but as valuable as they are, I wish he would pronounce the word "culinary" correctly ["kyu-lin-erry].

Nov. 15 2011 01:24 PM
Amy from Manhattan

And it wasn't just the team at the Lab! I'm 1 of I don't even know how many freelance copyeditors/proofreaders who worked on the book, sometimes broken into not just whole chapters but sections of chapters. It was a very interesting experience, & I learned a lot--I hadn't ever heard of sous vide before that project.

Nov. 15 2011 01:24 PM
John A.

Let them eat cake. Aerogel colloid cake. Whatever! #OWS

Nov. 15 2011 11:15 AM

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