Streams

Who Would You Name a Bridge After?

Friday, November 11, 2011 - 02:12 PM

During today's Please Explain on the names behind New York highways, bridges, parks, and neighborhoods, Columbia professor Kenneth T. Jackson suggested we ask listeners who they think deserves a landmark to be named for. So let us know!

Who would you name a bridge, roadway, park or other New York landmark after, and why?

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Comments [3]

Wyn Achenbaum from Stamford, CT

Henry George (b. 1839, Philadelphia; d. 1897, NYC), the author of "Progress and Poverty" and "Social Problems," among other books. He was dubbed "The Prophet of San Francisco," where he was a newspaperman, before writing P&P.

His ideas inspired the Anti-Poverty Society and led to the Progressive Movement. Along with Mark Twain and Thomas Edison, he was among the best known and most discussed public figures. He proposed what become known as the "Single Tax," which many people still regard as the ultimate tax reform to create society and economy in which all of us can prosper. (The Landlord's Game, on which Monopoly is based, was created to teach his ideas, circa 1902.)

He lived in Brooklyn for many years and is buried at Greenwood Cemetery. He died while running for mayor of NYC, and his funeral procession attracted millions of people. I commend his ideas to your attention, and think we ought to honor him with a bridge. (And fund it from the increase in land value that such a project would create!)

Nov. 11 2011 06:25 PM
Marcelo from Los Angeles

Teddy Roosevelt. Simply does not get enough love from his city of birth!

Nov. 11 2011 03:33 PM
Jacquelyn from Long Island

Emma Goldman because there are not enough things named after women and she was an activist who fought for worker's rights & economic justice, as well as other things. And, of course, she lived in New York.

Nov. 11 2011 03:23 PM

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