Streams

Inhibitors

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Friday, October 28, 2011

Ralph Izzo, the chairman, president and CEO of PSEG, talks about solar power and other energy issues in New Jersey. Plus: Rob Stein of the Washington Post explains a new recommendation by a federal advisory panel that boys receive the HPV vaccine; third way policies that can combat racial earnings disparities and refocus community college programs; and Paula Froelich on New York City neuroses. 

Occupy Protests in Oakland and Nationally

Scott Johnson, Oakland Tribune reporter, talks about the recent violence at Occupy Oakland, and NPR’s Margot Adler looks at the national picture.

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HPV Vaccine for Boys

Rob Stein, health reporter for The Washington Post, talks about the new federal advisory panel recommendation that boys receive the HPV vaccine.

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Moving Working Families Forward

Robert Cherry, Brooklyn College Broeklundian economics professor and co-author of Moving Working Families Forward: Third Way Policies That Can Work, talks about his new book and how third way policies can combat racial earnings disparities and refocus community college programs.

 

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Open Phones: Energy Audit

Listeners: How are you greening up your energy situation this year? Whether you've installed energy efficient light bulbs, chucked your air conditioner over the summer, or installed solar panels, we want to hear about it. What made you change your ways? And are you saving money? Call us at 212-433-WNYC.

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New Jersey Energy

Ralph Izzo, chairman, president and CEO of PSEG, talks about solar power and other energy issues in New Jersey.

Comments [26]

New York City Neuroses

Paula Froelich, contributing editor at Playboy, contributor to The New York Observer, and author of Mercury in Retrograde, talks about neuroses of New Yorkers and looks at an updated version of Karen Horney's list of neuroses from 1936.

Comments [32]

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