Streams

Scaling the Mountain

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Monday, October 24, 2011

Neville Isdell, former CEO of Coca-Cola, talks about running the world’s leading soft-drink company. We’ll find out about the mountaineers who were the first to attempt to scale Mount Everest in the early 1920s. Man Booker Prize–winning author Alan Hollinghurst describes his new novel, The Stranger’s Child. New Yorker writer John Cassidy looks at John Maynard Keynes’s economic philosophy and whether it can work to pull us out of the recession.

Inside Coca-Cola

Neville Isdell, former CEO of Coca-Cola, talks about his 30 years with the company and his role running the world’s leading soft-drink company. In Inside Coca-Cola: A CEO’s Story of Building the World’s Most Popular Brand, he describes opening markets in Russia, Eastern Europe, Philippines, and Africa, and explains the his ideals for corporate responsibility and ethics.

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Into the Silence: Exploring Mount Everest

Wade Davis gives an account of the generation of adventurers, soldiers, and mountaineers who attempted to tackle Mount Everest in the 1920s. In Into the Silence, he looks at how World War I affected these climbers and recounts the efforts of George Mallory and his fellow climbers to conquer the mountain in the face of treacherous terrain and weather.

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Alan Hollinghurst on The Stranger’s Child

The Man Booker Prize–winning author Alan Hollinghurst talks about his latest novel, The Stranger’s Child, a century-spanning saga about a love triangle that spawns a myth, and a family mystery, across generations.

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What would John Maynard Keynes Tell Us to Do?

New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy talks about the economic philosophy of John Maynard Keynes and whether it can work to pull us out of the economic recession. Today, many regard Keynes as the economist whose sweeping theory remains the best solution to our current woes, but conservative economists insist that Keynes’s ideas have failed to work. Cassidy’s article “The Demand Doctor” appeared in the October 10, 2011, issue of The New Yorker.

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Guest Picks: Alan Hollinghurst

Novelist Alan Hollinghurst was on the show recently, and he told us what he's been reading and watching lately.

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Guest Picks: Mike Daisey

Mike Daisey spoke to Leonard Lopate about his latest one-man show, "The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs," and he also revealed that he's a fan of yoga. Find out what he's been reading and watching recently...

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The Great Moby-Dick

Nathaniel Philbrick was on the show this week to talk about one of the greatest American novels, Herman Melville's Moby-Dick.

"I think of all the classics, Moby-Dick is the most reluctantly read. It is so long, it is digressive. Just when you think you're figuring out where it's going, Melville throws in a short chapter about something completely different. And it's a real challenge," Philbrick explains. "It's a book I find, later in life, when you have some life experiences to bring to the book, you begin to see it in a different light."

The digressions are about things like the whiteness of a whale, and ambergris (which is whale vomit), and chowder—Melville even includes a recipe for chowder!

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