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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: Oct. 6 - 12, 2011.

Thursday, October 06, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

David Smith cubes and art works that explore the boundary between the real and the imagined at the Whitney, psychedelic paintings that incorporate the human figure at Dodge Gallery, Edward Sorel's satirical cartoons at the Visual Arts Gallery and pieces at MediaNoche that bring the night sky (and other imagery) into the gallery space. Here's what's crackin' in the arts world in the coming week.

Real/Surreal at the Whitney Museum There’s always that moment in horror movies and end-of-world thrillers when everything gets eerily silent. Rooms stand empty and the air grows still, and the viewer suddenly realizes that something realllllllly bad is about to go down. If you enjoy that churning-in-the-pit-of-the-stomach kind of vibe, then put the Whitney’s Real/Surreal exhibit at the top of your to-do list. This highly compelling gathering drawn from the museum’s permanent collection gathers together 80 paintings, drawings, photographs and prints that explore the boundary between the real and the imagined in the period that surrounded World War II. The pieces in the show all seem to channel a distinct unease: industrial landscapes stand empty, figures are shrouded in robes, even the paintings of people at play seem contorted and strange — as if trapped in peculiar dreams, unable to wake up. Opens on Thursday, on the Upper East Side.

David Smith: Cubes and Anarchy at the Whitney Museum While you’re at the museum, be sure to pop upstairs to the fourth floor gallery, to examine the works by this influential 20th century artist (1906-1965), known for producing large-scale sculptures out of gleaming, welded steel. By now, his work may seem familiar — the sort of thing you see in sculpture gardens and while tooling around Storm King. But the show provides a thoughtful space in which to reconsider Smith's work and influences (which included everything from industrial infrastructure to surrealism to the constructivist works of artists such as Kazimir Malevich). The exuberant arrangements of cubes, rectangles and cylinders seem to defy gravity — and the gleaming, brushed steel sculptures from the ‘60s display a texture that is downright hallucinatory. Opens on Thursday, on the Upper East Side.

Go Figure at Dodge Gallery This exhibit, organized by painter Eddie Martinez, looks at the ways in which some contemporary artists are incorporating the human figure into their work. To be clear: this is not fuddy duddy portraiture. The artists in this show are splaying bodies along the edge of a canvas, showing figures that dissolve into painted backdrops and depicting faces that seem to melt in a explosions of psychedelic color. There’s even a clown painting. Opens on Thursday at 6 P.M., on the Lower East Side.

Edward Sorel, Nice Work If You Can Get It, at the Visual Arts Gallery For decades, Sorel has skewered American politicians, celebrities and cultural figures in his scratchy, satirical cartoons. His work has also been featured in publications as diverse as The New Yorker and The Nation. Now he will be honored as part of the School of Visual Arts’ Masters series. A good opportunity to see a compendium of his works. Opens Friday, in Chelsea. A reception for the artist will be held next Thursday, October 13 at 6 P.M.

Sutthirat Suparinya, Hypothetical, at MediaNoche Though a small space, this East Harlem gallery regularly challenges viewers with exhibits that explore the intersection of art and technology. This season, they will be displaying the works of Suparinya, a Thai-born artist who creates immersive pieces that bring the night sky (and other imagery) into the gallery space. Expect to be disoriented with sound, darkness and light. Opens Thursday at 6 .M., in East Harlem.

At the Whitney Museum: An exhibit devoted to the career of sculptor David Smith. Shown above: '17 h's' a wry piece of painted steel sculpture from 1950.
Carolina A. Miranda
At the Whitney Museum: An exhibit devoted to the career of sculptor David Smith. Shown above: '17 h's' a wry piece of painted steel sculpture from 1950.
Smith's abstract geometric sculptures feel buoyant, even though they are crafted out of steel. The brushed texture also gives them an ethereal luminosity  -- as in 'Untitled (Candida),' from 1965.
Carolina A. Miranda
Smith's abstract geometric sculptures feel buoyant, even though they are crafted out of steel. The brushed texture also gives them an ethereal luminosity -- as in 'Untitled (Candida),' from 1965.
Smith was drawn to steel because it felt contemporary.
© The Estate of David Smith/Licensed by VAGA, New York.
Smith was drawn to steel because it felt contemporary. "Metal possesses little art history," he once said. Seen here: 'Cubi I,' a vertiginous tower of cubes from 1963.
Dodge Gallery's latest show is dedicated to contemporary artists exploring the use of the human figure -- such as Gina Beavers' 'The Boxer,' a canvas from 2011.
Courtesy of the artist and DODGEgallery
Dodge Gallery's latest show is dedicated to contemporary artists exploring the use of the human figure -- such as Gina Beavers' 'The Boxer,' a canvas from 2011.
The show, which was organized by painter Eddie Martinez, features this 2007 work by Katherine Bernhardt titled 'Jaunelle Blue Bikini.'
Courtesy of the artist, CANADA and DODGEgallery
The show, which was organized by painter Eddie Martinez, features this 2007 work by Katherine Bernhardt titled 'Jaunelle Blue Bikini.'
And yes, there is a clown painting. (There always should be, as far as I'm concerned.) It's a canvas by Allison Schulnik called 'Green Eyes.'
Courtesy of the artist, Mark Moore Gallery, and DODGEgallery
And yes, there is a clown painting. (There always should be, as far as I'm concerned.) It's a canvas by Allison Schulnik called 'Green Eyes.'
SVA is paying tribute to political satirist Edward Sorel -- whose images have run in too many publications to count. Seen here: a 1972 illustration for 'Ramparts' magazine about Watergate.
Courtesy the artist and SVA
SVA is paying tribute to political satirist Edward Sorel -- whose images have run in too many publications to count. Seen here: a 1972 illustration for 'Ramparts' magazine about Watergate.
One of Sorel's ongoing series consists of illustrating first meetings between well-known figures -- such as this encounter between film director Jean Renoir and actor Erich Von Stroheim.
Courtesy the artist and SVA
One of Sorel's ongoing series consists of illustrating first meetings between well-known figures -- such as this encounter between film director Jean Renoir and actor Erich Von Stroheim.
In this <em>Vanity Fair</em> illustration from 2007, Sorel riffs on George W. Bush's 'Mission Accomplished' speech from 2003.
Courtesy the artist and SVA
In this Vanity Fair illustration from 2007, Sorel riffs on George W. Bush's 'Mission Accomplished' speech from 2003.
MediaNoche, in East Harlem, will be turned into a multi-sensory experience by artist Sutthirat Supaparinya. Seen here: a still from 'Shooting Stars.'
Courtesy the artist and Medianoche
MediaNoche, in East Harlem, will be turned into a multi-sensory experience by artist Sutthirat Supaparinya. Seen here: a still from 'Shooting Stars.'
Another piece from Supaparinya's multi-pronged installation at MediaNoche: 'Dotscape.'
Courtesy the artist and Medianoche
Another piece from Supaparinya's multi-pronged installation at MediaNoche: 'Dotscape.'
The Whitney's 'Real/Surreal' exhibit features plenty of works intended to unsettle -- such as George Tooker's 1950 painting, 'The Subway.'
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
The Whitney's 'Real/Surreal' exhibit features plenty of works intended to unsettle -- such as George Tooker's 1950 painting, 'The Subway.'
In neatly composed ways, the works in the Whitney show channel anxieties about environmental destruction and the end of humanity. Seen here: 'American Farm,' a 1936 painting by Joe Jones.
Carolina A. Miranda
In neatly composed ways, the works in the Whitney show channel anxieties about environmental destruction and the end of humanity. Seen here: 'American Farm,' a 1936 painting by Joe Jones.
Plus, a view of my favorite painting: Louis Guglielmi's 1941 canvas 'Terror in Brooklyn.' This is how I feel when <em>The New York Times</em> reviews restaurants in my neighborhood.
Carolina A. Miranda
Plus, a view of my favorite painting: Louis Guglielmi's 1941 canvas 'Terror in Brooklyn.' This is how I feel when The New York Times reviews restaurants in my neighborhood.

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Comments [4]

Noah Pettit from Long Island

where is your story about the disorienting cube that is in NYC now?

Oct. 12 2012 04:36 PM
nick from califorina

I have what I think is an original print of philip evergoods Lily and the sparrows.Printed overseas dated 1939. looking for a value.

Jan. 31 2012 10:52 PM

@janet singer Here's the link to that article: http://www.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-news/2011/nov/10/painting-pet-portraits-digital-age/ It's a good one!

Nov. 17 2011 08:19 AM
janet singer from manhattan

i was listening this morning a little before 10 am (nov.12) and caught a few words about a photography exhibit of dog portraits, i cannot find it on your website, could you please send me the info, thanks

Nov. 12 2011 10:12 AM

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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