Streams

New York Women Narrowed Wage Gap With Men in 2010

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Women still earn less money than men, but in New York State they are closing the gap.

Women still earn less money than men, but in New York State they are closing the gap.
New government data show median weekly earnings for women in New York rose in 2010 to 747 dollars, while men's stayed flat at 861 dollars.
Martin Kohli [KOH-lee] is an economist with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and he has a hunch about the narrowing wage gap.
[CutID: <DAVID:DigaSystem\NEWS>PB8-NCR4-DAW_73D6EC211EA44BB4AAFA35233255623D.WAV
Time: 8s
Title: news20111005_EMPLOYMENT_kohli
Out-cue: ]
[the recession has not affected men and women equally and it might be that the recovery is not affecting men and women equally.]
While male dominated fields like construction and finance have seen little growth in wages or employment, female-dominated sectors like healthcare are doing better. 
Kohli says women's take home pay is growing at a rate close to the historical average, while men's wages have stalled between 2009 and 2010.

New government data show median weekly earnings for women in New York rose in 2010 to $747, while men's stayed flat at $861.

"The recession has not affected men and women equally, and it might be that the recovery is not affecting men and women equally," said Martin Kohli, an economist with the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While male-dominated fields like construction and finance have seen little growth in wages or employment, female-dominated sectors like healthcare are doing better. 

Kohli said women's take home pay is growing at a rate close to the historical average, while men's wages have stalled between 2009 and 2010.

 

Women's Earnings in New York

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

Latest Newscast

 

 

Support

WNYC is supported by the Charles H. Revson Foundation: Because a great city needs an informed and engaged public

Feeds

Supported by