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Comments Round-Up: Reactions to Occupy Wall Street

Monday, October 03, 2011

As the Occupy Wall Street protests escalate, so do the comments. Time for a good old-fashioned round-up: Here's what people have been saying on The Brian Lehrer Show and on It's a Free Country. Read and weigh in for yourself.

On the phones

Tori in Brooklyn

I feel like there haven't been bulleted, ideological points that they're trying to accomplish. So basically I'm like, why aren't you working? The only way we're going to be able to get anywhere is if we do it the right way, if we use proper channels. Without having a clear idea of what we're trying to accomplish, we can't really get anything done.

Amy in Montclair

If you don't cry, you dont get your mother. There's a huge disconnect between Main Street and Wall Street; now what we have is really a witness to Wall Street...Now we have people watching.

Ziyad in Manhattan

Whether you like it or not, it's a great exercise in democracy. For too long, government has had complete equity to make decisions on behalf of the people, and people really have not spoken up like they used to in the '60s and '70s...This kind of movement reminds the government, hey, there are people out there on Main Street who are suffering, and you guys aren't addressing this issue.

Jimmy in The Bronx

We all have tried to use the system, and we've seen the system betray us. Obama has gone the way of Wall Street and somebody has to speak up. These people are doing it, and until Obama wakes up, he's going to be a one-term president.

On the web

Katherine Jackson

[P]lease don't make an equivalency between Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party. The Tea Party, with its anti-government, pro-deregulation position has massive funding from corporate interests. Occupy Wall Street has no such funding and indeed, opposes the very interests funding the Tea Party. Of course, there are ordinary Americans in the Tea Party, independent of the backers, but there is simply no equivalence between a group whose ideology comports so easily with large scale political interests and one whose philosophy clearly does not.

Michael from Brooklyn, NY

Anyone making the argument that there isn't a goal and that the movement doesn't have direction just isn't paying attention. The NY General Assembly web site is where you need to look for minutes of each meeting, minutes of all the working groups, and for the "Declaration of the Occupation of New York City." (http://nycga.cc/)

JS from Brooklyn

I would ask those eager to be condescending and dismissive towards the protesters "lack of clear objectives" to suggest their own solution to the current dysfunctional political and economic situation. There is clearly a very complicated and massive systemic problem in this country stemming from absurd campaign finance laws, antiquated electoral and legislative rules (filibuster), massive amounts of corporate influence in the political process, and a dependence on consumerism for economic prosperity, among many other things. To acknowledge and protest the current system is not "conspiratorial" as a conspiracy implies that a handful of individuals are pulling the strings. Instead, the nature of our political and economic systems have lead us here while the majority of the public has not been paying attention. Now people are taking notice that things aren't right - and that's a good enough start for me.

Marc from Brooklyn

They want college loans forgiven. They want home mortgages forgiven. Let me get this straight, 'cause I used to get hit in the head a lot: these people want the benefit of these major assets—valued in the hundreds of thousands of dollars—and then don't want to pay for them? Where I come from, that's called theft.

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Comments [64]

Greg Davies

The perptrators of this collosal theft need to be prosecuted. Are we supposed to believe that these enormously wealthy men leading four or five major investment firm are innocent? Are we to believe that they all made the same mistake at the same time and in spite of accurate information to the contrary, they all decided that the status-quo was the correct avenue of action? These were the most experienced investors in the world and when the crash came they all pretended they did not know what happened. They plundered billions from the people and appear to have gotten away free.

Jan. 21 2012 02:15 PM
Cortney from New York, NY

I work on Wall Street. I get up everyday at 6am. I'm at work by 7:15am. I usually leave between 4:30 and 5pm and other than a quick bathroom break here and there, I don't leave my desk. I bring my lunch because I don't have time to go out. I pay federal, state, property and income taxes. I buy things. I give to charity. I work hard to make a living. I WISH I had days of free time to sit in a park and protest. This country wants to punish people who pay their taxes allowing for the government to be able to continue to dole out endless dollars in unemployment, welfare and medicaid. Let's ask ourselves, what would happen without the financial industry?

Oct. 10 2011 02:18 PM
American

There's only one way to deal with these commie agitators... Send in the scoops!

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=9ec_1296901185

Oct. 08 2011 06:46 PM
Anne Boggan from Upper West Side

Not sure who to direct this to so just want to register it here: I attended the rally and march on Wednesday in Foley Square. Advance announcements asked people to gather in Foley Square and to march south at 5:30 pm. However, police barricades blocked exit from Foley Square toward the south. The only way out of the Square was to walk back to Worth Street at the north end of Foley Square and walk over to Broadway or up to Canal Street. A friend and I stopped for coffee to figure out what to do. I decided to take a bus as far south on Broadway as I could. As we approached Chambers Street, we saw the march enter Broadway and start marching south. I got off the bus and joined the march. I was happy to find them, but it appeared to be a deliberate attempt by the police to prevent a large number of people from joining the march. Later around 7 pm, as we approached Liberty Street, I saw a large number of police vehicles heading south on Broadway including police wagons indicating that arrests might be planned. I left the group after we reached Zuccotti Park about 7:15. I saw on the news last night that arrests indeed did take place around 8 or 9 pm.

Oct. 06 2011 04:20 PM
C B from Bronx, NYC

The so-called protests, dishonestly called "movements", are in reality organized by PACs for progressive candidates or "progressives".
(I support other PACs for other reasons. I do not characterize my views as "progressive".)

Remember when women and children and men walked over a bridge to assert their right to REGISTER to vote and to protest unjust laws?

Oct. 06 2011 02:22 AM
judith ackerman from Upper west side

I was at the demo for the school aides yesterday and as a member of the UFT I'll be there again, singing with the Raging Grannies. I'm furious. The schools will fall apart without the school aides.

Oct. 05 2011 10:42 AM
Bernie from UWS

Mayor Bloomberg's congenital arrogance was at the heart of the calamitous attempt to snuff out Occupy Wall Street with mass arrests. The too-clever-by-half strategy entailed literally entrapping and arresting more than 700 people who the police led onto the Brooklyn Bridge, while a police officer inaudibly read out a statement saying that anyone doing so could be arrested. This kind of round-up has worked before, at the Republican convention, against the Critical Mass bike riders, etc. A broader public did not take notice because their minds were elsewhere. But this level of bullying only potentiates opposition when a populace is already aroused. The prior week's pepper spraying of demonstrators who were under police control (and offering no resistance) was widely condemned. But, more important, the economic crisis now seems wholly out of control. People have been waiting for a cause, a nucleus around which active public protest could coalesce. Bloomberg's out-of-touch bullying has done for the organizers of OWS what they had hoped, but could not have accomplished by themselves -- made defense of OWS a cause to act -- the moral mandate that mobilizes a movement.

Oct. 03 2011 09:16 PM
Action : Contact NY Attorney General NOW from R.I.C.O. the Robosigning Bank Leaders

Contact NY Attorney General Eric Schneiderman NOW at :

http://www.ericschneiderman.com/contact

Demand R.I.C.O. charges against the robo-signing banks and their leaders.

(Alternatively, people who have been unjustly foreclosed upon may also
file private RICO charges which would allow for seizure of bank and bank leaders' assets, long prison terms &/or treble damages against the banks and bank leaders.)

Racketeering - under R.I.C.O. - for a pattern of engaging in fraud and embezzlement and conspiracy for profit.

Hopefully, the Attorneys General for NY, CA, OH and other states will consider filing these CRIMINAL charges. It is the just thing to do - and even if it fails - FILING the CHARGES will show that even the wealthy and powerful are not above the law.

If the prosecutors refuse to do their duty to protect American homeowners from Racketeering, fraud and theft, then hopefully protestors and supporters will note :

There is also a provision for private parties to sue. A "person damaged in his business or property" can sue one or more "racketeers".

The prosecutors may be reluctant to anger an organization with such powerful octapus-like tentacles throughout government and the economy - but then that's what R.I.C.O. was made for.

Granted, any politician who supports this will lose millions of dollars of campaign contributions, but they will gain the support and gratitude of most of the population who they serve. Again, this is what RICO was made for.

Demand RICO charges vs the robosigning Bank leaders.

Sources :

http://abcnews.go.com/US/ohio-mom-jailed-sending-kids-school-district/story?id=12763654

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2011/09/07/akron-mom-williams-bolar.html

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2011/07/mortgage_robo-signing_is_still.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racketeer_Influenced_and_Corrupt_Organizations_Act

Oct. 03 2011 03:42 PM
R.I.C.O. charges for Robosigning Bank Leaders from Demand RICO charges vs the robosigner Bank leaders.


Kelley Williams-Bolar is an Akron mom who was convicted of Felony perjury for trying to send her child to a better and safer school by listing her dad's address as her own.

Meanwhile, the Bank leaders who oversaw the fraudulent embezzlement of 1000s of innocent people's homes via the Robosigning scandal have gotten off with a slap on the wrist (that won't even effect them personally).

They should at least be charged with :
1) felony perjury and fraud - re the robosigning.
2) embezzlement (theft of the homes of people who hadn't even defaulted, and on people whose loans they did not have rights to forclose upon).
3) home invasion
and
4) Racketeering - under R.I.C.O. - a for pattern of engaging in fraud and embezzlement and conspiracy for profit.

Hopefully, the Attorneys General for NY, CA, OH and other states will consider filing these CRIMINAL charges. It is the just thing to do - and even if it fails - FILING the CHARGES will show that even the wealthy and powerful are not above the law.

If the prosecutors refuse to do their duty to protect American homeowners from Racketeering, fraud and theft, then hopefully protestors and supporters will note :

There is also a provision for private parties to sue. A "person damaged in his business or property" can sue one or more "racketeers".

The prosecutors may be reluctant to anger an organization with such powerful octapus-like tentacles throughout government and the economy - but then that's what R.I.C.O. was made for.

Granted, any politician who supports this will lose millions of dollars of campaign contributions, but they will gain the support and gratitude of most of the population who they serve. Again, this is what RICO was made for.

Demand RICO charges vs the robosigning Bank leaders.

Sources :

http://abcnews.go.com/US/ohio-mom-jailed-sending-kids-school-district/story?id=12763654

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2011/09/07/akron-mom-williams-bolar.html

http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2011/07/mortgage_robo-signing_is_still.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Racketeer_Influenced_and_Corrupt_Organizations_Act

Oct. 03 2011 02:52 PM
Joe B from Brooklyn

John A., I get it. I thought the cops on the street were doing a fine job and had the feeling some of them would have been in the march if they weren't in uniform. It's NYPD upper management I have a problem with. They need to be held publicly accountable. People deserve an explanation as to why 700!!! people were arrested.

If their role is to "protest and serve", the NYPD should have navigated the crowd off the bridge. It would have opened up the bridge and the FDR in about 45 minutes rather than several hours.

This is why it felt like an effort to intimidate the public. It made no sense.

On the other hand, it helps radicalize the protesters, and it will probably inspire them to take the bridge intentionally in the future.

Oct. 03 2011 01:57 PM
John A.

Joe B,
I admire you for taking the two viewpoints towards the police. I chose B. Beware of the attitude that all government is working against us. The police are more blue collar than WallStreet, and, most everyone.

Oct. 03 2011 01:13 PM
Joe B from Brooklyn

I was one of the people who were almost arrested. I wasn't even protesting - I just decided to go along with the march since I needed to get to my home over the bridge.

As the crowd proceeded over both the roadway and the pedestrian path, the police made no effort whatsoever to inform anyone on the roadway to turn around. There was not a bull horn in sight.

The only reason I avoided arrest is because a young woman hanging on the bridge railing had the gumption to start yelling at us to take the pedestrian path instead. But by then it was too late. A large number of people had already passed.

THEREFORE, one must conclude that either:

A. The police intentionally corralled the protestors to make a planned mass-arrest (entrapment)

OR

B. The police poorly maneuvered an easily controllable situation and were simply in dereliction of duty.

BRIAN - When you get the police perspective tomorrow, it would be great if you asked whoever your guest is which one was it???

Does anyone else here agree with my suggestion???

Oct. 03 2011 12:33 PM
Kenneth Barta from Spotswood, NJ

What you failed to mentioned is that the protesters who were arrested on the Brooklyn Bridge were forced into public transit buses commandeered by the New York police department. The union has filed a protest in court. See Daily Kos blog.

Oct. 03 2011 11:48 AM
Amy from Manhattan

Billy Gray, did you really just call a grown woman a "girl"? Just because you disagree w/someone is no excuse for belittling them, especially in terms of their sex. Would you have called the other guest "that boy"?

And Sophie, way to pile on in the anti-feminism. Yes, the journalist is doing women's work.

Oct. 03 2011 11:24 AM

I detect a dismissive note of hostility in Brian's comments regarding the occupywallst.org movement. Please keep in mind that much of what we today (women voting, equal rights, free speech) also started as movements. Having been down to occupywallst it is obvious that people are gathering in solidarity, creating awareness and creating space for serious dialogue about American economy and values. The later is something Brian barely accomplished today in his coverage of occupywallst.

Oct. 03 2011 11:20 AM
lisa

best coverage from Brian about this to date. More guests like this please.

Oct. 03 2011 11:18 AM
Marc from Brooklyn

"Organize, occupy and let's create and experiment to create a better world!"

Yeah. We'll be liquidating kulaks any day now.

Oct. 03 2011 10:56 AM
dboy from nyc

Is it just me or is Brian generally dismissive toward this movement?

This is a serious issue not a bunch of nuts!!

This movement represents the sentiments of many across teh working and middle class!

We're FED UP!!

Oct. 03 2011 10:55 AM
Audrey from Norwalk, CT

Occupy Wall Street is a natural phenomenon for Americans who are "mad as hell and aren't gonna take it any more." Unlike the Civil Rights and Anti-War (Vietnam) protests which appealed to government to legislate humanely, we can no longer count on government to help solve our problems. Our current government IS the problem... in bed with corporations for the mutual $$$ gain. The declaration by Occupy Wall Street is 100% right on. Including our poisoned food, water and air! Protests need to be peaceful--Gandhi and MLK showed us this kind of success is possible.

Oct. 03 2011 10:48 AM

Allow the movement to grow organically, like the Arab Spring. All the grievances are valid and point to something bigger than a single issue.

Oct. 03 2011 10:44 AM
Walter Benjamin from Brooklyn

Don't fear the language of occupation and don't let laughter neutralize militancy! Occupation and militancy are the only way to create a real social movement that explodes the sham of a crapped out system of representation for the corporate elites. The American dream is a lie! Organize, occupy and let's create and experiment to create a better world!

Oct. 03 2011 10:43 AM
Michael from Brooklyn

There is a live stream of the activity at Liberty square at www.livestream.com/globalrevolution. See for yourself how the process works!

Oct. 03 2011 10:41 AM
Barbara from Brooklyn

A couple of views/some ideas to consider:

http://disoccupy.wordpress.com/

http://politics.salon.com/2011/09/28/protests_21/singleton/

Oct. 03 2011 10:41 AM
Roz from Brooklyn

Brian L.-

Is it fair to say:

Tea Party trying to put a strong spot light on government and to voice their grievances with our governments power.

Occupy Wall Street is trying to put a strong spot light on the major financial crisis Wall St. is responsible for.

We are seeing being on both sides, right and left, getting together to be heard.

Oct. 03 2011 10:41 AM
Marc from Brooklyn

I hear that they're agitating for a new law to imprison everyone who owns four chickens or two milk cows.

The want college loans forgiven. They want home mortgages forgiven. Let me get this straight, 'cause I used to get hit in the head a lot: these people want the benefit of these major assets -- valued in the hundreds of thousands of dollars -- and the don't want to pay for them? Where I come from, that's called theft.

At least we've clarified the gist of their demands.

Oct. 03 2011 10:40 AM
Jaime from TriBeCa

FYI
I think the last caller was incorrect. The correct saying in Spanish is:
'El que no llora, no mama' or 'He who doesn't cry, doesn't suck (eat)'.

The squeaky wheel gets the oil.

Oct. 03 2011 10:40 AM
JS from Brooklyn

I would ask those eager to be condescending and dismissive towards the protesters "lack of clear objectives" to suggest their own solution to the current dysfunctional political and economic situation. There is clearly a very complicated and massive systemic problem in this country stemming from absurd campaign finance laws, antiquated electoral and legislative rules (filibuster), massive amounts of corporate influence in the political process, and a dependence on consumerism for economic prosperity, among many other things. To acknowledge and protest the current system is not "conspiratorial" as a conspiracy implies that a handful of individuals are pulling the strings. Instead, the nature of our political and economic systems have lead us here while the majority of the public has not been paying attention. Now people are taking notice that things aren't right - and that's a good enough start for me.

Oct. 03 2011 10:40 AM
Edward from NJ

The Tea Party was actually once a real grassroots movement. It probably had a few thousand, younger, libertarian-leaning adherents. It got bigger, blander and more mainstream-GOP when established movement conservatives got behind it.

A lot of Tea Party folks would agree with OWS about a lot of the problems in America while disagreeing about the causes. The Tea Party blames it all on the big-bad government. Occupy Wall Street blames it all on the big-bad corporations. Both are are absurdly simplistic.

Oct. 03 2011 10:36 AM
Julie from Manhattan

The police were definitely duplicitous on Saturday. They had buses ready for arrested demonstrators long before anyone stepped off of the pedestrian walkway. Perhaps they covered their butts by making an announcement at the front of the march, but they allowed well over 1000 of us to be on the bridge BEFORE surrounding us and the arresting 700 of us. Their excuse that we were tying up traffic is ridiculous - we were marching across, and would have cleared the bridge in 1/2 an hour. By arresting 700, they tied up traffic for 5 hours.

Oct. 03 2011 10:36 AM
Leo in NYC from New York, baby!

@ Eric from Bklyn —

We read the 1st amendment aloud on the pedestrian walkway of the bridge when the police tried to move us with their "Freedom Nets." And they backed down. "...or abridging the freedom of speech ... or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." is pretty clear language!

That was the pattern all afternoon — some higher up somewhere would give some nonsensical, usually unlawful order which would filter down to the poor blue shirts who would then halfheartedly try to enforce it. And then usually give up. And again, as usual, we were peaceful, and all of the danger and conflict came from the police inserting themselves pointlessly into the situation.

Oct. 03 2011 10:35 AM

This person "reporting" on Occupy Wallstreet is NOT a reporter. Of course he is free to air his opinions - but this is not reporting, it is opinion

Oct. 03 2011 10:34 AM
Sara from Brooklyn, NY

To the woman who said that she couldn't get behind the movement until there is a bulleted list of demands:

http://occupywallst.org/forum/proposed-list-of-demands-please-help-editadd-so-th/

Oct. 03 2011 10:33 AM

You cannot compare this movement with the Tea Party which has from the beginning had Koch money and professional organizers from Dick Armey etc. and its own mouthpiece through FOX, which is why these small, noisy groups got constant airtime and this group got almost nothing even after weeks of protest. Give me a break! One group is a minority leveraging big money to argue against government spending at all levels, while the other is a group representing vast numbers of the unemployed who have gotten lip service from both parties and almost no action from a Congress that has been captured by corporate forces led by a Tea Party minority ready to sacrifice the middle class in favor of those whose income doesn't depend upon a paycheck.

Oct. 03 2011 10:31 AM
John A. from the 99%

Could it be that Both the TEA and 'Occupy' movements were established to correct Republican failings?
-
I'm not so sure about the 'we are the 1%' mention...
Look to --> WeAreThe99percent.

Oct. 03 2011 10:31 AM
Martha from Brooklyn

Birmingham, AL has a long labor history. Instead of acting shocked that the Occupy Wall Street movement arrived there, you should let us know when the demonstrations make their way to Greenwich or Westport or the Hamptons.

Oct. 03 2011 10:31 AM
Martha from Brooklyn

Birmingham, AL has a long labor history. Instead of acting shocked that the Occupy Wall Street movement arrived there, you should let us know when the demonstrations make their way to Greenwich or Westport or the Hamptons.

Oct. 03 2011 10:29 AM
Sophie from Poughkeepsie, NY

@Billy Gray from Greenpoint

She was working--didn't you hear the water running and the dishes clinking in the background? ;~)

Oct. 03 2011 10:29 AM
Stephanie Nesser from New Jersey

I don't see this movement as being aligned with one particular political party. I think that it is a reaction to, what Brian said earlier, the nexus between the financial sector, corporations and our political sector.

Oct. 03 2011 10:28 AM
Robert Johnson from Manhattan

Occupy Wall Street so far is amorphous, which keeps it all-inclusive. Everyone's hurt by the Yankee dollar, or lack thereof.

This issue stands alone without help from Democrats or Republicans, who with few exceptions are subsumed by their congressional brothels.

The demand now is the occupation itself and the direct democracy occurring at Liberty Plaza.

Oct. 03 2011 10:28 AM
Janet from Brooklyn, NY

They keep comparing this to the Tea Party. Worth noting that the Tea Party was a movement born of rage over getting healthcare for poor, sick people, while Occupy Wall St is a movement born of rage over banks stealing our houses and crashing our economy.

Kind of encapsulates the difference between right and left.

Oct. 03 2011 10:28 AM
Arthur from BK

They should change their name to The American Dream Party. More uplifting and encompassing than the militant connotation "Occupy Wall Street" implies.

Oct. 03 2011 10:27 AM
Sophie from Poughkeepsie, NY

@Robert from NY

Thank you! The snickering is annoying. And they all seem to be ignoring the fact that these protests are getting larger and popping up in other cities.

Oct. 03 2011 10:27 AM
Greg

If we have to use a name for this budding movement, why not Main Street, rather than the tag "occupy wall street"?

Locally, the oppressive, even aggressive, stance of the NYPD against protests, dating to even before those frigid days in 2003, has to be an issue.The problem is the NYPD occupying Main Street.

Progressives _are_ Main Street.

Oct. 03 2011 10:26 AM
Milton from QUEENS

The idea of poisioning our food chain is not conspiracy thinking, it is in regards to the many recent food recalls, recalls that are due to factory farming techniques.

Oct. 03 2011 10:26 AM
Carol

Re: the comments about corporations poisoning the food supply as being conspiratorial.. don't you know what Monstanto does?? Besides putting the local farmer across the country out of business.. they are genetically modifying the food supply. Obviously you don't find this alarming.

Re; the people who need "bullet points" to explain why they're in the streets.. do a little research. American's are very lazy when it comes to news consumption.

Oct. 03 2011 10:26 AM
RJ from prospect heights

Your guests are working hard to diminish, minimize, and dismiss the Occupy Wall Street activities. "Revolutionary" "rhetoric"--from what it sounds like, the statement was, as you pointed out, modeled on the Declaration of Independence. Had they a list of "demands" they would diminish them for being a "mishmash" of agenda items and no coherent plan. It has a clear sense of purpose: The Wall Street wealthy offenses--of which they give concrete, well-known examples-have fundamentally damaged Americans. It is the responsibility--constitutionally-of the people we elect to address them, and this is a group of Americans attempting to do so. I know you're under pressure to make quick, "savvy," punditry, but please, try to stop dismissing them!

Oct. 03 2011 10:25 AM
amalgam from NYC by day, NJ by night

In any successful social movement, there must be a SIMULTANEOUS interaction between the grassroots, the "grasstops," messaging/communications, appeal to broad audience, etc. None of this happens quickly, especially if it's a true endogenous social movement.

The fact is that many of these peoples' concerns echo anti-globalization studies and movements of the past 20 years. I mean there are academics and protestors working on these issues for DECADES. I know because I have conducted scholarly studies (and a degree) for years.

Oct. 03 2011 10:25 AM
Holley Atkinson from Brooklyn

It's wishful thinking (from Heilman?) to say that OWS might somehow turn into a broader movement along Tea Party lines. Yes it may have started as an insurrection with no real leader, but the Tea Party has been massively funded now by the Koch Brothers. So the "grassroots" have major $$$ most of which is well under the radar of the public (and the mainstream media).

Oct. 03 2011 10:24 AM
Michael from Brooklyn, NY

The Occupy Wall Street movement is engaging in direct participatory democracy. This doesn't create soundbites and bullet points, rather it's a process to come up with new solutions and new ways of approaching the problems we're all facing. It is revolutionary in approach. It's slow, but deliberate and it allows everyone to be involved.

Anyone making the argument that there isn't a goal and that the movement doesn't have direction just isn't paying attention. The NY General Assembly web site is where you need to look for minutes of each meeting, minutes of all the working groups, and for the "Declaration of the Occupation of New York City." (http://nycga.cc/)

The movement is incredibly diverse because the goal is to give voice to the 99% of the population who don't have access to lobbyists, who can't buy politicians. As a result, the message is also full of diverse ideas. This is a good thing, and it's by design.

Michael,
The People's Library at Liberty Plaza

Oct. 03 2011 10:24 AM

Unlike the faux "populist" Tea Party organizations , Occupy Wall Street doesn't have a giant media network advertising and shaping it, ie. Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. , Fix, etc. And the various "Tea Party" expresses get their main funding and professional staff from right wing millionaires like Koch, Coors, Mellon, and so on. Brian, invite well Informed journalists from the Nation or the Atlantic or Mother Jones, Rolling Stone. These guests are clueless.

Oct. 03 2011 10:23 AM
Billy Gray from Greenpoint

Did that girl just get on the radio and say that there's no defined list of beliefs or coherent statements, "no bullet-points," after Brian read aloud the OWS statements as published in their paper? Geez.

Also, what's with the hand-wringing, the desperate need for bullet-points? Can I get you some TPS reports with your case of the Mondays? "Don't these people have jobs?" Somebody get her a job blogging for AEI.

Oct. 03 2011 10:23 AM
Milton from QUEENS

Brian: Occupy Wall Street is related to WE ARE THE ONE PERCENT. It is a movement (a leaderless revolution) to take back the goverment from the ultra rich IE Koch brothers. We are trying to highlight and publicize the wall street greed that lead to the world economic collapse and unprecedented foreclosure rate in this country.

Oct. 03 2011 10:22 AM

Simply a response to massive transfer of wealth over last 15 years to top one percent. No bullet items yet because it is an awakening, not a reckoning.

Oct. 03 2011 10:22 AM
paulb from Brooklyn

I think this "movement" will be great as long as it doesn't devolve into a smorgasbord of every grievance held by anyone on the left or its fringes. It has to be focused in a way that resonates with those not hanging their toes off the front of the board.

Oct. 03 2011 10:19 AM
Robert from NYC

Well isn't it up to YOU the media to find out what it is you say you have no idea about what this is about? Sitting on your bum in a studio with headsets collecting YOUR annual six figures and being smug about the Wall Street protesters is a bit arrogant. Stop snickering over the language of the statement of purpose.
Poisoning the food supply is reference, more likely, to genetically modified foods. Do you really find that funny, Brian? Do you?

Oct. 03 2011 10:18 AM
Mike from NYC

16 people have died of the latest listeria outbreak. Where is the USA Today journalist living? Or does she just pay attention to Republican political PR?

Oct. 03 2011 10:17 AM
Alvin from Manhattan

It's the Green Tea Party!
1. A confused mix of complaints
2. No coherent solution to problems
3. Extreme, possibly illegal, proposals.
The left can be just as crazy to the right.

Oct. 03 2011 10:16 AM
Shawn from Manhattan

http://www.jpmorganchase.com/corporate/Home/article/ny-13.htm?TB_iframe=true&height=580&width=850

We are against bribes from corporations to public officials. Chase bank recently gave to NYPD 4.6 Million dollars. This bribe was the largest single 'donation' in the nypd history. This at a time of civil unrest and police brutality, how can they do this? Isn't it obvious to everyone they are bribing the police to quell protests?

Oct. 03 2011 10:15 AM

Joe stiglitz threw his Nobel weight behind the occupation search YouTube

Oct. 03 2011 10:13 AM
Gary from Upper Left Side

I'm writing this comment before I even hear the segment (look at the time stamp). Based upon past experience from listening to The Media (including WNYC), The Media will get Occupy Wall Street totally wrong. Just like The Media got the Tea Party Movement wrong. Just like The Media missed the lead ups to the Crash of 2008, the Iraq War and 9/11. Note to The Media: journalists DO NOT write the first page of history.

Oct. 03 2011 10:12 AM
Katherine Jackson

Brian, please don't make an equivalency between Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party. The Tea Party, with its anti-government, pro-deregulation position has massive funding from corporate interests. Occupy Wall Street has no such funding and indeed, opposes the very interests funding the Tea Party. Of course, there are ordinary Americans in the Tea Party, independent of the backers, but there is simply no equivalence between a group whose ideology comports so easily with large scale political interests and one whose philosophy clearly does not.

Oct. 03 2011 10:12 AM
CT from Harlem / Zuccotti Park

The movement needs clarity and focus. Here's a start: http://yfrog.com/h7thesoj

Oct. 03 2011 10:12 AM
Marc from Brooklyn

Congrats on founding a new People's Republic. Let me know when you start going after kulaks.

Oct. 03 2011 10:09 AM
Eric from B'klyn

The 1st Amendment is generally understood to cover freedom of speech. However, in light of the arrests, the 1st Amendment also protects the right of the people peaceably to assemble." Here is the exact text: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." Over the years, Mayor Bloomberg and the NYPD seem to ignore this constitutionally protected right.

Oct. 03 2011 10:07 AM

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