Streams

Edmund de Waal on The Hare with Amber Eyes

Monday, October 03, 2011

Edmund de Waal, a world-famous ceramicist who inherited a collection of 264 tiny Japanese wood and ivory carvings, called netsuke. He describes his quest to find out who had touched and held them, and how the collection had managed to survive. The Hare with Amber Eyes is part-memoir and part detective story of his discovery both the story of the netsuke and of his family over five generations.

Guests:

Edmund de Waal
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Comments [3]

Frida from nyc

OMG, I'm reading this book at the moment. On page 100 and it's absolutely engaging.

Feb. 21 2013 04:21 PM
Lisa Bradshaw from New York City

How nice to hear his voice! I loved the book, and have given it to my mother, brother, daughter, and several friends, all of whom have loved reading it. De Waal unfolds a breathtaking story, augmented by a marvel of research to reveal a new perspective on the culture of Europe in the 18th and 19th Centuries. We are brought in a deeply personal way to see the tragedy Nazis inflicted on Europe, and feel the deprivation we endure from having lost such families as his. The connections of culture that he makes are fascinating. Actually, I particularly enjoyed the cross referencing of ideas and opinions among Charles Ephrussi, his artist friends and his social life, which De Waal discovered documented, so much later. Perhaps what people find so evocative is how the immigrants to Austria and France actually became the staunchest supporters and best exemplars of the ideals of the cultures in the countries they came to. Such a story should make anyone question nationalistic pride; this is a very lively and complex narrative, beautifully woven, and thoroughly entertaining.

Oct. 21 2011 11:37 AM
Vinny from Manalapan, NJ

Your link for " The Hare with Amber Eyes" , http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312569378%20/wnycorg-20/ is not valid. You should fix it.

Oct. 03 2011 01:01 PM

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