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Context and a Movie: "Moneyball"

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Rob Neyer, national baseball editor for Baseball Nation and former employee of baseball statistics legend Bill James, discusses sabermetrics and how it did or did not change baseball. Dana Stevens, Slate's film critic and co-host of Slate's Culture Gabfest, joins him to discuss "Moneyball." 

Guests:

Rob Neyer and Dana Stevens
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Comments [4]

Mark from NJ

The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach was recently published and is, like Moneyball, a great story about big ideas yet likely to be dismissed by people who are not baseball fans. It's shaping up to be an interesting month for baseball. All we need now is something new from George Will.

Sep. 29 2011 03:03 PM
Sam from Astoria

Ahh, Mike Pesca. The best sub host of Leonard Lopate acquits himself will on BL too!

Sep. 29 2011 12:00 PM
cori

Here's a link to an interview with Art Howe about his response to the film:
http://blog.chron.com/ultimateastros/2011/09/28/art-howe-livid-over-his-portrayal-in-moneyball/

Sep. 29 2011 12:00 PM
kevin from upper LS

the point that people miss, is that they all, i believe, play money ball,now. it's just that, the teams that have money, in addition to sabermetrics, have a real[probably unfair] advantage. playoff and world series wins, cannot reflect the efficacy of sabermetrics,as the sampling is just too small. if you listen to sports talk,a lot of people will try to mindlessly dimiss the system, by saying that so and so, did not ,"win it all".

Sep. 29 2011 10:53 AM

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