Streams

Your Slave Map

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Ambassador at Large, senior advisor to the Secretary of State and director of the State Department’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, Luis CdeBaca, and the president of Slavery Footprint, Justin Dillon, talk about forced labor and measuring a person's slavery "footprint."

Guests:

Luis CdeBaca and Justin Dillon

Comments [24]

anonyme

@jgarbuz from Queens I hope nobody ever abducts you! Would you call it slavery in that case, I wonder. I understand there is quite a bit of human trafficking/sex slavery happening in nearby Jackson Heights, Queens. I believe this show gave it some coverage. Maybe you commented that that, too was better than "working on subsistence land and starving from drought from time to time."

Sep. 22 2011 09:41 AM
Peter Jones from Manhattan

Regarding the question about slavery in Israel, I refer you to a June 28 article in the
Jerusalem Post . . .

http://www.jpost.com/NationalNews/Article.aspx?id=226901

Sep. 21 2011 10:06 PM
PHYLLIS BEALLOR from ct

what is the name of the app for tracking the slavery footprint?

Sep. 21 2011 11:53 AM
Hank

So what now? I try to buy fair trade products and as much organic as possible, but I am having to make concessions due to economic pressures. It seems implausible that the companies, especially the big guys, don't know that they are participating in slave labor.

Sep. 21 2011 11:52 AM
Arvind from NYC

An excerpt from a book regarding East India vs West India sugar (from 1828):

"May every man, before he indulges his appetite with blood-bought luxury, reflect upon the price it cost. Not eightpence, or tenpence, or twelvepence, or fourteenpence the pound only; but the groans, and wounds, and deaths. As he sweetens his tea, let him reflect on the bitterness as the bottom of the cup. Let him bring the subject home to his heart, and say, as he truly may, this lump cost a poor slave a groan; - and this, a bloody stroke with a cart whip; - and this, perhaps, worn down by fatigue and wretchedness and despair, he sunk under his misery and died. And then let him swallow his beverage with what appetite he may."

From "Reasons for using East India Sugar", available for viewing at British Library online:
http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/carviewsvirtex/apprabol/reaseastindsug/zoomify70947.html

Sep. 21 2011 11:51 AM
ursula from brooklyn

Just last week I saw a documentary from 2007 'The Price of Sugar' that deals with Haitians being smuggled into Dominican Republic with a promise of 'good work' only to be literally enslaved and forced to work in the DR sugar cane fields, without having any basic human rights. It turns out that majority of sugar imported into the US is from Dominican Republic, so we are all using this product whether we want it or not - whether at home or all of the products that we buy. Brian,
thanks for bringing this topic to such a wider audience, and I urge everyone to be aware that we have the responsibility to make better choices with our wallets.

Sep. 21 2011 11:50 AM
Patricia from Brooklyn

I am a chocolate lover, and it broke my heart when a friend informed me that many brands I that I enjoy use child slave labor... My question was. How is this possible!?
I now try to buy chocolate labeled "Fair Trade"
But it is not always available.
I've also tried to be a conscience consumer but far to often it is impossible to find products where you know the true origin.

Sep. 21 2011 11:48 AM
ursula from brooklyn

Just last week I saw a documentary from 2007 'The Price of Sugar' that deals with Haitians being smuggled into Dominican Republic with a promise of 'good work' only to be literally enslaved and forced to work in the DR sugar cane fields, getting paid in 'vouchers' and not having any basic human rights. It turns out that majority of sugar imported into the US is from Dominican Republic, so we are all using this product whether we want it or not - whether at home or all of the products that we buy. Brian,
thanks for bringing this topic to such a wider audience, and I urge everyone to be aware that we have the responsibility to make better choices with our wallets.

Sep. 21 2011 11:48 AM
Myrna from Brooklyn

what about sexual slavery in the USA? This is the State Department of the US we're talking about, whose representatives refer to sexual slavery in Israel and elsewhere. Why so silent about what's happening right here?

Sep. 21 2011 11:48 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

Typical liberal slop.

Sep. 21 2011 11:48 AM
ursula from brooklyn, ny

Just last week I saw a documentary from 2007 'The Price of Sugar' that deals with Haitians being smuggled into Dominican Republic with a promise of 'good work' only to be literally enslaved and forced to work in the DR sugar cane fields, getting paid in 'vouchers' and not having any basic human rights. It turns out that majority of sugar imported into the US is from Dominican Republic, so we are all using this product whether we want it or not - whether at home or all of the products that we buy. Brian,
thanks for bringing this topic to such a wider audience, and I urge everyone to be aware that we have the responsibility to make better choices with our wallets.

Sep. 21 2011 11:47 AM
Craig from France

So I have to use the app on a smart phone which is responsible for 3.5 slaves per user?

Sep. 21 2011 11:47 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

Slavery my foot! Kids used to work on the farm all the time in America. In factories too. So we got rich and no longer needed that. OTher countries aren't so advanced yet. These are not "slaves" but rather those who still believe that working in a mine or factory is still better than working on subsistance land and starving from drought from time to time. I bet a lot of people in Somalia today would rather be "slaves" in a nasty factory than watching their children starve when the rains don't come!

Sep. 21 2011 11:46 AM
Amy from Manhattan

If you buy used products (e.g., in thrift shops), you may not avoid products that are made by slaves, but at least your money doesn't go to fund the slavery, & it often goes to a good cause.

Sep. 21 2011 11:45 AM
carooma from Brooklyn

Just saw a documentary called The Price of Sugar about Haitians being enslaved in the Dominican Republic on sugar plantations. The US imports a lot of its sugar from the Dominican Republic.

Sep. 21 2011 11:44 AM
linda from Brielle NJ

wish your website worked.

Sep. 21 2011 11:41 AM
Catherine from Brooklyn

What about shopping in thrift stores? What about food banks? In this economy especially, I think it's important to factor in where people are shopping.

Sep. 21 2011 11:40 AM
tom

What about prison labor?

Sep. 21 2011 11:37 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

Is slavery still prevalent in the production of chocolate?

Sep. 21 2011 11:37 AM
Jack from Gardiner, NY

Yes, I am only getting a static web page.

Sep. 21 2011 11:36 AM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

Please clarify if this is going to be only available as an app or is it going to be available online? I don't have a smart phone i-doohicky thing so an "app" is useless to me

Sep. 21 2011 11:36 AM
Anne from NYC

Please name the website again

Sep. 21 2011 11:36 AM
Sam

I know this segment hasnt aired yet so I don't know the track Brian is going to take but can we please get a clear definition of "slave" from
this organization lest we are given to misinformation, differences in economy and worst of all, dilution of a term indicative of grave crimes against humanity.

I am am a consumer and human "externalities" (to put it crudely) are a concern to me so I am looking forward to this segment and the launch of the website.

Sep. 21 2011 11:09 AM
Lucas from Brooklyn

If you're going to plug your website, it needs to be ready when you're on a show speaking about it. I won't care to remember by slavery footprint in two days.

Sep. 21 2011 09:19 AM

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