Streams

Fatherhood and Testosterone

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

New York Times science reporter, Pam Belluck, talks about the new study showing a hormonal response to circumstances -- a man's testosterone level drops when he becomes a father. 

Guests:

Pam Belluck
News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [8]

Abe from Boston

Jeff and Peter, the limitations that you (and the caller) claim to have discovered were described directly in the journalist's article itself. It always pays to aim first, then fire.

Sep. 13 2011 07:37 PM
Jeff from Brooklyn

Thank you so much for the caller illuminating the fact that the entire story was based on faulty and incomplete data.

Yet another example of a journalist trying to pimp a "sexy" headline / story instead of investing more time on a topic.

No disrespect to the journalist in questions, but in order to have a better product to consume, we as media consumers need to demand more from the people whose job it is to create media.

xox

Sep. 13 2011 12:03 PM
Peter from Hackensack, NJ

So basically as the caller aptly pointed out our study is useless as it leaves out many other factors that you acknowledge is important for accurate conclusions? I hardly call that a study. Lol

Sep. 13 2011 11:59 AM
Carlos from Astoria

My husband and I just adopted a baby boy, now 2.5 months old, and I am the stay at home dad. I do have to say I notice a few signs of lower testosterone, less sex drive, less muscle density. Now, it may just a huge change in lifestyle, but who knows?

Sep. 13 2011 11:55 AM
Jim from Somerville

So, can we "conclude" that the previous guest (the father with 24 children) has barely any testosterone anymore?

Sep. 13 2011 11:54 AM
William from Manhattan

I say this is definitely a candidate for The Week magazine's "Health Scare of the Week" feature. One glimmer of hope is the study does not seem population-controlled? All the participants are from Philippines (eg, Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Bisaya/Binisaya, Hiligaynon, Bikol, Waray)? I would have to read the study, but also would want to see if there could be other confounding factors leading to this result in this population.

Sep. 13 2011 11:53 AM
jgarbuz from Queens

General question for your guest. Do chimpanzees, apes and other primates even know who their fathers are?

Is "fatherhood" just a relic of patriarchy?

Sep. 13 2011 11:52 AM
gary from queens

Does testosterone also drop if the male is gay?

Just scientifically curious. I'm not gay.

Not that there's anything wrong with it.

Sep. 13 2011 10:13 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.