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This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: September 8 - 14

Thursday, September 08, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC
At the Jewish Museum: The illustrations of childrens' author Ezra Jack Keats, creator of 'The Snowy Day' — the first full-color picture book to feature an African-American protagonist. (Copyright Ezra Jack Keats Foundation)

Get ready for art OVERLOAD. This week, the sleeping monster that is the art industry wakes up and comes roaring back to life all over the city: uptown, downtown, in the museums and in just about every nook and cranny where you could possibly hang a piece of found-object assemblage (a.k.a. trash sculpture). So put on your comfortable walking shoes and pack a flask. If this week doesn’t make your brain melt, then I don’t know what will.

PLUS: If you really want to experience the best of the scene-y scene, be sure to check out my Gallerina Guide to the fall art openings in Chelsea — complete with map, audio guide and places to get schnockered.

The Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats at the Jewish Museum This exhibit is a tribute to Keats, the children’s book author and illustrator behind numerous award-winning titles. (He illustrated more than 80 in his lifetime.) Keats was a born and bred New Yorker who grew up in poverty in the hardscrabble area of East New York, but would go on to make history with his bright collages and delightful children’s tales. His most famous work, “The Snowy Day,” published in 1962, was the first modern full-color picture book to feature an African-American protagonist. Opens Friday on the Upper East Side.

September 11 at MoMA PS1, in Queens Of all of the 9/11-themed shows opening this week (and there are a lot), this is by far the most intriguing. Organized by MoMA PS1 curator Peter Eleey, it is the opposite of what the title might suggest: rather than feature art that was made in reaction to or in the wake of the attacks, Eleey has chosen to bring together more than 70 works that have a deeper resonance as a result of what happened. Many of these were made years prior to 2001 — but reflect the keen ways in which our cultural gaze has changed since that date. Opens Sunday, in Long Island City.

Ingres at the Morgan at the Morgan Library & Museum The library has put together a series of 17 sumptuous drawings by the French master of portraiture. (A classic of his is this view of Napoleon, all surly contemptuousness.) The exhibit features informal sketches and fleshed-out graphite works, including a very sexy depiction of an odalisque. Opens Friday, in Midtown.

Rolling Stone and the Art of the Record Review at the Society of Illustrators Rock ‘n roll, people. For fans of illustration and music, there is this exhibit — devoted to the myriad depictions of the famous and infamous that have appeared in Rolling Stone’s pages — running the gamut from Neil Young to Young Jeezy. Expect everything from drawing to painting to collage. Opens Friday at 6:30 P.M., on the Upper East Side.

Signs of Life: Photographs by Peter Sekaer and Harper’s Bazaar: A Decade of Style at the International Center of Photography A variety of new exhibits are opening at this venerable institution. These are the most compelling — and at opposing ends of the spectrum in terms of tone and content. Sekaer’s photographs are part of a series shot during the Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration and offer a gripping portrayal of life during difficult times. The Harper’s Bazaar show is all frivolous and fun, depicting a decade’s worth of the fashion bible’s most significant imagery. Opens Friday, in Midtown.

Fashion in Film, a film festival devoted to style and design in the movies, at the Museum of Arts and Design MAD has teamed up with Vanity Fair magazine for a fashion-y film festival timed to the sartorial extravaganzas of Fashion Week. (Like there isn’t enough going on.) Expect to feast your eyes on ‘60s stripes, billowy harem pants and rad biker looks. Kicks off with a screening of "Qui Êtes-Vous, Polly Magoo?," this Friday at 8:30 P.M, in Midtown.

Gallerina Guide to Chelsea Fall Openings 2011


As I may have mentioned, you can find all my Chelsea happenings right here (or by clicking the map icon at left). But needless to say, there’s plenty of stuff happening all over town. Here are gallery shows in other neighborhoods that have caught my wandering eye:

Third Streaming in SoHo has put together a show of images and ephemera from the Black Power movement tied to the US theatrical premire of 'Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975.' Angela Davis is shown above.
Courtesy of Third Streaming (NY)
Third Streaming in SoHo has put together a show of images and ephemera from the Black Power movement tied to the US theatrical premire of 'Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975.' Angela Davis is shown above.
'Mixtape' is crafted from a cache of rare footage shot in the '60s by a Swedish documentary team and features interviews with the movement's major players, such as Stokely Carmichael.
Courtesy of Third Streaming (NY)
'Mixtape' is crafted from a cache of rare footage shot in the '60s by a Swedish documentary team and features interviews with the movement's major players, such as Stokely Carmichael.
MoMA PS1 is taking an intriguing look at how the attacks of September 11 have changed the way we see our culture and ourselves. Shown here: Susan Hiller's 'Monument,' from 1980-81.
Courtesy the artist and Timothy Taylor Gallery, London
MoMA PS1 is taking an intriguing look at how the attacks of September 11 have changed the way we see our culture and ourselves. Shown here: Susan Hiller's 'Monument,' from 1980-81.
The PS1 exhibit avoids works made in reaction to the attacks. Instead, it looks at pieces that might have more resonance as a result of them — like Mary Lucier's 'Dawn Burn,' from 1975.
Collection San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
The PS1 exhibit avoids works made in reaction to the attacks. Instead, it looks at pieces that might have more resonance as a result of them — like Mary Lucier's 'Dawn Burn,' from 1975.
Carolina A. Miranda
An installation view of PS1's exhibit: Christo's 'Red Package' from 1968 is in the foreground. On the wall is a piece by Barbara Kruger, from 1991.
Carolina A. Miranda
MoMA PS1's hallways feature an installation by British artist Fiona Banner called 'Black Bunting' — a piece that the curator described as both "celebratory and elegiac."
Carolina A. Miranda
Sometimes PS1's show gets lost in the clutter: This room contained a pulverized jet engine by Roger Hiorns, a sculpture by George Segal and a swelling soundtrack by John Williams. Seriously.
Seventeen drawings by French master Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres go on display at the Morgan Library this week — including this ravishing 'Odalisque' from 1839.
Morgan Library & Museum
Seventeen drawings by French master Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres go on display at the Morgan Library this week — including this ravishing 'Odalisque' from 1839.
The Ingres exhibit at the Morgan features drawings from throughout the artist's life. Shown here: 'Portrait of a Young Boy,' rendered in graphite.
Morgan Library & Museum
The Ingres exhibit at the Morgan features drawings from throughout the artist's life. Shown here: 'Portrait of a Young Boy,' rendered in graphite.
From Ingres to Eminem: The Society of Illustrators has gathered more than four decades of art from <em>Rolling Stone</em> record reviews — including Stephen Kroninger's 2002 depiction of Eminem.
Courtesy the artist and the Society of Illustrators
From Ingres to Eminem: The Society of Illustrators has gathered more than four decades of art from Rolling Stone record reviews — including Stephen Kroninger's 2002 depiction of Eminem.
The <em>Rolling Stone</em> exhibit features a wide gamut of famous musicians depicted in an array of styles, including Bob Dylan, as collaged by Hanoch Piven.
Courtesy the artist and the Society of Illustrators
The Rolling Stone exhibit features a wide gamut of famous musicians depicted in an array of styles, including Bob Dylan, as collaged by Hanoch Piven.
At the ICP, an exhibit devoted to the photography of <em>Harper's Bazaar</em>. Believe it or not I have a picture just like this. Except mine was taken at Gatorland in Orlando.
Jean-Paul Goude, Naomi Campbell (Harper's Bazaar, September 2009)
At the ICP, an exhibit devoted to the photography of Harper's Bazaar. Believe it or not I have a picture just like this. Except mine was taken at Gatorland in Orlando.

Seriously. And yes, that's a live 'gator I'm sitting on.

The <em>Harper's Bazaar</em> exhibit comes just in time for Fashion Week, which kicks off on Thursday. Shown here: an image by Ralph Gibson.
Ralph Gibson, Caroline Winberg (Harper's Bazaar, May 2005)
The Harper's Bazaar exhibit comes just in time for Fashion Week, which kicks off on Thursday. Shown here: an image by Ralph Gibson.
Because too much fashion is never enough: the Museum of Arts & Design is showing stylish films in honor of Fashion Week, including 'Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill!' I love me some Tura Satana!!!
Courtesy Museum of Arts & Design
Because too much fashion is never enough: the Museum of Arts & Design is showing stylish films in honor of Fashion Week, including 'Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill!' I love me some Tura Satana!!!
MAD's fashion screenings are the result of a collaboration with <em>Vanity Fair</em>. Can't get enough of these stripes from 'Qui Êtes-Vous, Polly Magoo?'
Courtesy Museum of Arts & Design
MAD's fashion screenings are the result of a collaboration with Vanity Fair. Can't get enough of these stripes from 'Qui Êtes-Vous, Polly Magoo?'
Stop! Those shoes don't go with those pants. Also part of MAD's film series:
Courtesy Museum of Arts & Design
Stop! Those shoes don't go with those pants. Also part of MAD's film series: "The Eyes of Laura Mars."
And 'cuz I'm feeling comic-y: be sure to check out the etchings of Tony Fitzpatrick at Pierogi Gallery in Williamsburg. Shown here:
Courtesy the artist and Pierogi Gallery
And 'cuz I'm feeling comic-y: be sure to check out the etchings of Tony Fitzpatrick at Pierogi Gallery in Williamsburg. Shown here: "Bazooka Hulk," from 2011.
Feeling very Hairy Who: Joe Grillo and Jason McLean team up for some collaborative cartoony drawings that are all about color. Shown here:
Courtesy the artists and Allegra LaViola Gallery
Feeling very Hairy Who: Joe Grillo and Jason McLean team up for some collaborative cartoony drawings that are all about color. Shown here: "Bonk/Crash Worship," from 2011.

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About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

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