Streams

Look | Aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene

Sunday, August 28, 2011

WNYC

PHOTOS. From flooding to downed trees, see how Tropical Storm Irene has affected the Tri-State area. You can share your Hurricane Irene experiences or read what others were doing while we blogged the aftermath of the storm.

warrenjackson/flickr
Calm after the storm.
An elevated view of The World Trade Center sit, which sustained no damage when Hurricane Irene hit the region and city on August 28, 2011 in New York City.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty
An elevated view of The World Trade Center sit, which sustained no damage when Hurricane Irene hit the region and city on August 28, 2011 in New York City.
The view from the Upper West Side on Sunday.
Irene Trudel/WNYC
The view from the Upper West Side on Sunday.
Nancy Zakhary and Eddie Lima of Brooklyn wade through flood waters filling the intersection of Main St and Plymouth St in Dumbo Brooklyn as Hurricane Irene reaches the New York City Area on August 28,
Jemal Countess
Nancy Zakhary and Eddie Lima of Brooklyn wade through flood waters in Brooklyn on August 28, 2012.
Flooding caused by Hurricane Irene, the nearby Atlantic Ocean and the breaking of local dams on August 28, 2011 covers areas of Spring Lake, New Jersey.
Michael Loccisano/Getty
Flooding caused by Hurricane Irene near Spring Lake, New Jersey.
Photo Caption: On August 27, 2011, Hurricane Irene struck Newark with full force. Here, flooding affects a portion of South Street in the East Ward.
Photo Credit: Newark Press Information Office, D. Lippman
Photo Caption: On August 27, 2011, Hurricane Irene struck Newark with full force. Here, flooding affects a portion of South Street in the East Ward.

To report animals that need rescuing, downed trees, or flooded streets, contact the Non-Emergency Call Center at (973) 733-4311.

Water from Hurricane Irene causes flooding in neighborhoods on August 28, 2011 in Spring Lake Heights, New Jersey.
Michael Loccisano/Getty
Water from Hurricane Irene causes flooding in neighborhoods on August 28, 2011 in Spring Lake Heights, New Jersey.
Irene caused damage to the Spring Lake boardwalk on the Jersey Shore.
Elizabeth Culp
Irene caused damage to the Spring Lake boardwalk on the Jersey Shore.
Post-Irene: A rainbow across the fishing pier that survived the storm in Ocean Grove, N.J.
Elizabeth Culp
Post-Irene: A rainbow across the fishing pier that survived the storm in Ocean Grove, N.J.
Residents slip past a barricade to enter Valentino Pier in Red Hook Brooklyn as the skies clear in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in New York City.
Jemal Countess
Residents slip past a barricade to enter Valentino Pier in Red Hook Brooklyn as the skies clear in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in New York City.
Children watch workers remove the plywood from the front windows of the Johnny Rocket's at the South Street Seaport just hours after Hurricane Irene blew through the city August 28, 2011.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty
Children watch workers remove the plywood from the front windows of the Johnny Rocket's at the South Street Seaport just hours after Hurricane Irene blew through the city August 28, 2011.
Tourists make the best of New York City on Sunday.
Anna Sale/WNYC
Tourists make the best of New York City on Sunday.
Tracks at Metro-North's Tuckahoe station were flooded to the third rail at 3 p.m. on Sunday, August 28.
Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority./flickr
Tracks at Metro-North's Tuckahoe station were flooded to the third rail at 3 p.m. on Sunday, August 28.
A dog bag dispenser in Edgewood Park in New Haven, Connecticut.
ancient history/flickr
A dog bag dispenser in Edgewood Park in New Haven, Connecticut.
A tree down in Hillsdale, NJ.
Gregg Gasperino/WNYC
A tree down in Hillsdale, NJ.
The parking lot of the Metro-North station at Harriman, on the Port Jervis Line, was under water.
Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
The parking lot of the Metro-North station at Harriman, on the Port Jervis Line, was under water.
Two trees uprooted by Hurricane Irene fell side-by-side in Bayside, Queens.
Annmarie Fertoli/WNYC
Two trees uprooted by Hurricane Irene fell side-by-side in Bayside, Queens.
A team hauls debris off the road in Central Park on Sunday as walkers amble by.
Lynn Kim
A team hauls debris off the road in Central Park on Sunday as walkers amble by.
Power lines on Metro-North Railroad's Harlem Line were brought down at Valhalla.
Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority./flickr
Power lines on Metro-North Railroad's Harlem Line were brought down at Valhalla.
A woman and a child sit on a public bench amid floodwater on Rockway Beach after Hurricane Irene swept through New York City on August 28, 2011.
Emmanuel Dudand/AFP//Getty
A woman and a child sit on a public bench amid floodwater on Rockway Beach after Hurricane Irene swept through New York City on August 28, 2011.
People walk along a sand-swept beach at Coney Island following heavy rain and winds from Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty
People walk along a sand-swept beach at Coney Island following heavy rain and winds from Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Trees fell on power lines in Greenwich, CT.
Steven Ehrlich/WNYC
Trees fell on power lines in Greenwich, CT.
Crews found a mudslide at Glenwood on the Hudson Line.
Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority./flickr
Crews found a mudslide at Glenwood on the Hudson Line.
A massive Black Walnut came down along East Main Street in Brookside, NJ all but sparing Pat Hettling's house.
Bob Hennelly/WNYC
A massive Black Walnut came down along East Main Street in Brookside, NJ all but sparing Pat Hettling's house.
New York City Transit employees pumping water out of the 148th Street / Lenox Subway Yard.
Photo by Metropolitan Transportation Authority / George Von Dolln./flickr
New York City Transit employees pumping water out of the 148th Street / Lenox Subway Yard.
Heavy surf pounds the beach after Hurricane Irene swept through on August 28, 2011 in Long Beach, New York.
Mike Stobe/Getty
Heavy surf pounds the beach after Hurricane Irene swept through on August 28, 2011 in Long Beach, New York.
Mansoor Kahn/WNYC
A huge tree was uprooted at Nostrand Ave. and Eastern Parkway Sunday in Brooklyn.
Hightstown, NJ under water.
N0 Photoshop/flickr
Hightstown, NJ under water.
A car gets stuck on 12th Avenue, between 135th and 136th Street.
Mirela Iverace
A car gets stuck on 12th Avenue, between 135th and 136th Street.
Massive hardwoods came down and snapped power poles and lines on Woodland Avenue in Brookside, NJ.
Bob Hennelly/WNYC
Massive hardwoods came down and snapped power poles and lines on Woodland Avenue in Brookside, NJ.

Similar situations all along the path of Irene left several hundred thousand New Jersey households without power.

The Hightstown, NJ fire house flooded, post-Irene.
N0Photoshop/flickr
The Hightstown, NJ fire house flooded, post-Irene.
A young man rides his bicycle through flood waters along the East River Bikeway after Hurricane Irene dumped more than six inches of rain August 28, 2011 in New York City.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty
A young man rides his bicycle through flood waters along the East River Bikeway after Hurricane Irene dumped more than six inches of rain August 28, 2011 in New York City.
David Lutz of Red Hook wades through water over two feet deep as he enters the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
Photo by Jemal Countess//Getty
David Lutz of Red Hook wades through water over two feet deep as he enters the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.

The hurricane hit New York as a Category 1 storm before being downgraded to a tropical storm.

Checking out the East River.
Lynn Kim/WNYC
Checking out the East River.
Another shot of the 71st St. Pedestrian Bridge.
Lynn Kim/WNYC
Another shot of the 71st St. Pedestrian Bridge.
Looking across the East River from the 71st St. Pedestrian Bridge in Manhattan.
Lynn Kim
Looking across the East River from the 71st St. Pedestrian Bridge in Manhattan.
Stephen Lopez walks his dog Gomez through flood waters along the East River Bikeway after Hurricane Irene dumped more than six inches of rain August 28, 2011 in New York City.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty
Stephen Lopez walks his dog Gomez through flood waters along the East River Bikeway after Hurricane Irene dumped more than six inches of rain August 28, 2011 in New York City.
The East River is returning back to normal on Sunday afternoon.
Caitlin Thompson/WNYC
The East River is returning back to normal on Sunday afternoon.
George St. north of Glen Ave. is flooded in Ridgewood, NJ.
Han Oh
George St. north of Glen Ave. is flooded in Ridgewood, NJ.
A tennis court at East River Park, post-Irene.
david_shakbone/flickr
A tennis court at East River Park, post-Irene.
Bond St. in Manhattan on Sunday.
Dan Nguyen/flickr
Bond St. in Manhattan on Sunday.
Chamjiv Brar/WNYC
Valentino Pier on Sunday morning in Red Hook, Brooklyn.
Water runoff headed to Hudson River, Dutchess Junction, NY.
Karen Frillman/WNYC
Water runoff headed to Hudson River, Dutchess Junction, NY.
Sarah Milstein
A downed tree at 92 Fort Greene Place, post-Irene in Brooklyn.
Fairway in Red Hook, Brooklyn.
Ilya Marritz/WNYC
Fairway in Red Hook, Brooklyn.
Cindy Rodriguez/WNYC
A tree leans against a car in Jackson Heights, Queens on Sunday.
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP//Getty
A flooded Coney Island street on Sunday.
Alana Casanova-Burgress/WNYC
Rains from Tropical Storm Irene flooded streets in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.
Joe Raedle/Getty
A sailboat is washed ashore as Hurricane Irene arrives on August 28, 2011 in Southampton, New York.
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty
A taxi sits in flood water on Coney Island after Hurricane Irene hit on Sunday.
Spencer Platt/Getty
A person walks her dogs down a street in Brooklyn during heavy rain and winds from Hurricane Irene on August 28, 2011 in New York City.
Alana Casanova-Burgess
More flooding in Greenpoint, Brooklyn on Sunday.
Ailsa Chang/WNYC
Trees down in Riverside Park on Sunday morning.
A man makes his way through a flooded street in Brooklyn, New York, August 28, 2011.
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty
A man makes his way through a flooded street in Brooklyn, New York, August 28, 2011.
A man walks across 42nd Street in Times Square in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds.
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty
A man walks across 42nd Street in Times Square in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds.
A New York City Police car drives through a flooded intersection on 43nd Street in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds.
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty
A New York City Police car drives through a flooded intersection on 43nd Street in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and Tri State area with rain and high winds.
Mansoor Khan/WNYC
A downed tree post-Irene blocks a portion of the sidewalk in Crown Heights.
Irene's winds had blown off plastic held down by sandbags meant to keep water out of subway grates in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.
Mansoor Khan/WNYC
Irene's winds had blown off plastic held down by sandbags meant to keep water out of subway grates in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.
Another tree down on Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights.
Mansoor Khan/WNYC
Another tree down on Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights.
Manhattan is hit by Hurricane Irene, in New York, on August 28, 2011. A weakened Hurricane Irene tore Sunday into New York, hammering Manhattan's skyscrapers with fierce winds.
Emmanuel Dudand/AFP/Getty
Manhattan is hit by Hurricane Irene, in New York, on August 28, 2011. A weakened Hurricane Irene tore Sunday into New York, hammering Manhattan's skyscrapers with fierce winds.

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Comments [8]

Philip Gisser from New York City

Let's remember history. FEMA totally screwed up under George H.W. Bush. Clinton appointed a professional to run it and it's performance was stellar during his administration. Under George W. Bush, the agency was again politicized and failed spectacularly. Now, under Obama, it is working again. The lesson. Republicans don't believe in government and they don't know how to run it. Let's not give them another chance to screw it up.

Sep. 01 2011 02:55 PM
Marion Loewenstein from New York

Congratulations for Governors Bloomberg and Christie, for their verycompetent organization , which therefore was responsible for limited if any injuries, and damage which could have been a lot worse. ,,also their care of the seniors. thank you both .mhl

Aug. 31 2011 08:56 PM
Wally Balloo from northern Westchester, which made it through okay

I think that the area's preparations saved money. By shutting down mass transit, it is likely that busses and trains were not damaged or stranded, and were kept safe in garages. By closing roads motorists were not given the opportunity to be put in positions needing costly rescue. Overtime will always be there, but I do think the measures imposed were cheaper than the alternative.

Aug. 29 2011 04:46 PM

I personally thought much was made out of not much, but I rethought about it and agree that it is certainly better to be safe than sorry. I am glad authorities took precautions and that we now have few things to take care of in the East Coast to go back to normal.

Aug. 29 2011 12:28 PM
Selma

I am grateful that noone was hurt, for the few brave souls or fools, who did go out to the beach to ride waves, or kayak the hudson> well nuff said..but I feel that it was a great test, and a job well done by all Emergency Management teams of NYC to help us prepare for any other catastrophic threat/or storm. We NYers take alot for granted, and if you have read anything about global warming, these events can happen at any given time in any town/city/country..we should be happy that we fared well given the circumstances. Many other people in this country this year were not so lucky, and they have more experience than we do with these events. I dont think the media, or the elected officials over dramatized anything..fact I am impressed with most of whom normally I dont agree with, but this was and is about the people. Stop complaining please, would you want to be rebuilding a whole town like Joplin? Or just emptying water from your basement.

Aug. 28 2011 11:44 PM
Martha from Hoboken

@Jerome: that's an interesting point. Our mayor in Hoboken, Dawn Zimmer, also had her emergency act very much together, and I was impressed by both NYC and Hoboken's plans. It has also occurred to me that some of the things we had to do this weekend would also be things to do during, heaven forbid, another 9/11 attack. I am glad that things turned out the way they did, at least in the NYC area, in terms of the weather. But I was very glad that there seemed to be some order and organzation about this response, too.

Aug. 28 2011 10:08 PM
carolita from NYC

For all those who are still complaining that the MTA "overreacted", they may be overlooking the fact that MTA workers are humans, with spouses, children, parents, and homes to either evacuate or protect -- just like you. They needed to go home early like the rest of us. Also, the with no transportation available, less fools were able to travel and be dithering around in the wrong places at the most dangerous hours, thereby leaving emergency workers available for those who needed them. Think!

Aug. 28 2011 06:50 PM
Jerome from Prospect Heights, Brooklyn

My wife and I speculate that one reason for the character of the Bloomberg administration's response to Irene is this--something that, so far, we have not heard any commentators suggest :

Predictions connected to global climate change include higher sea level and stronger, more frequent tropical storms. New York City has been actively making plans to cope with the possible impacts of these things, including flooding in low-lying areas.

Given that New York was right in the path of Irene, perhaps the city government seized this opportunity to test and refine its systems and strategies for the future, as well as mount a response to the clear present threat.

Aug. 28 2011 01:06 PM

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