Streams

This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: August 25 - 31

Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

A museum records itself, 19 women artists show their works alongside the figures who inspired them and an American Indian artist gives traditional forms a contemporary sheen. Plus: balloon poems on Governor's Island. It's a quiet out week in the art industry. Here's what we're looking at:

Carlito Carvalhosa, Sum of Days at the Museum of Modern Art Brazilian artist Carvalhosa has rigged the museum’s atrium with a sound installation that will simultaneously record and broadcast the sounds of the museum. The installation will change over time, as a new layer of sound is added to the broadcast each day. By the end of the show, in November, it should be a cacophony of more than two months worth of museum chatter and other auditory activity. The physical installation consists of a walk-through fabric-lined spiral (think: ginormous Bounce dryer sheets fluttering gently in the air conditioning) with microphones and speakers dangling right over the path. I’ll be keeping a record of how the piece evolves (careful what you say), so keep your eye (and ears) on this space. Through Nov. 14.

The Influentials, SVA Women Alumni Invite Artists Who Have Shaped Their Work at the School of Visual Arts Gallery In a show that is all about inspiration, curators at SVA invited 19 women alumnae to show their work alongside an artist they consider influential. The idea should result in some interesting pairings. Smash master Kate Gilmore (literally, she likes to smash stuff in her videos) pays tribute to the sumptuous work of Marilyn Minter (known for that Times Square licking video). Lisa Kirk, an artist interested in public actions, gives a nod to David Hammons, the artist who once sold snowballs in downtown Manhattan. While video artist Marianne Vitale cites Hungarian film director Béla Tarr, a figure known for his epic movies. Opens Friday, on West 26th Street, in Manhattan. A reception will be held on Thursday, September 8 at 6pm.

Preston Singletray, Echoes, Fire and Shadows at the National Museum of the American Indian If you haven’t been by the Museum of the American Indian to check out its permanent collection install (revamped last year), then it’s high time to hightail it to downtown Manhattan. But, while you’re there, be sure to pop into Preston Singletray’s exhibit of glass works. A Tinglit artist from the Pacific Northwest, Singletary finds a way of transforming traditional imagery into plays on light and shadow. You’ve got two more weeks. Through September 5, in the Battery.

The Truth is I Am You, a project by the Cause Collective on Governor’s Island The Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art has teamed up with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council for a Governor’s Island install by Cause Collective that will feature a floating poem inspired by Andy Warhol’s Silver Clouds. Each floating unit will consist of a speech bubble printed with a single line, each in one of the 25 most spoken languages in New York. Should be a good opportunity to chill on Governor’s Island...provided that little hurricane named Irene doesn’t get in the way. Opens Saturday at 3 P.M. DUE TO THE HURRICANE, ALL EVENTS ON GOVERNOR'S ISLAND HAVE BEEN CANCELLED FOR THE WEEKEND.

The National Museum of the American Indian is wrapping up an exhibit by Preston Singletary, a glass artist of Tinglit origin. Shown here: the 16-foot cast-glass triptych 'Clan House.'
Courtesy the artist and NMAI
The National Museum of the American Indian is wrapping up an exhibit by Preston Singletary, a glass artist of Tinglit origin. Shown here: the 16-foot cast-glass triptych 'Clan House.'
Singletary, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, incorporates traditional designs onto glass objects — such as 'Wolf Hat' — working with light and shadows.
Courtesy the artist and NMAI
Singletary, who hails from the Pacific Northwest, incorporates traditional designs onto glass objects — such as 'Wolf Hat' — working with light and shadows.
Singletary's 'Breaching Whale' takes its form from traditional wood carving, but the glass gives the figure a contemporary translucency.
Courtesy the artist and NMAI
Singletary's 'Breaching Whale' takes its form from traditional wood carving, but the glass gives the figure a contemporary translucency.
On MoMA's second-floor atrium, Brazilian artist Carlito Carvalhosa has created an installation that is all about layers of sound.
Photo courtesy the artist
On MoMA's second-floor atrium, Brazilian artist Carlito Carvalhosa has created an installation that is all about layers of sound.
Carvalhosa's mics will collect the day's sounds and layer them onto a soundtrack that will be played back the following day — a cacophonous record of everything said.
Photo courtesy the artist
Carvalhosa's mics will collect the day's sounds and layer them onto a soundtrack that will be played back the following day — a cacophonous record of everything said.
'Untitled,' by Jeremy Yoder, from 2009 — part of the women alumni exhibit at the School of Visual Arts.
Courtesy of Jeremy Yoder
'Untitled,' by Jeremy Yoder, from 2009 — part of the women alumni exhibit at the School of Visual Arts.
Because there was no way I wasn't going to include this: Mika Rottenberg's photo, 'Vincent and Dexter from Tropical Breeze,' from 2004.
Courtesy of Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery and the artist
Because there was no way I wasn't going to include this: Mika Rottenberg's photo, 'Vincent and Dexter from Tropical Breeze,' from 2004.
Also at SVA: An image of a sculpture by Huma Bhabha, known for pieces made from gritty materials — all of it looking as if it is on the verge of disintegration.
Courtesy of Salon 94, NY
Also at SVA: An image of a sculpture by Huma Bhabha, known for pieces made from gritty materials — all of it looking as if it is on the verge of disintegration.
On Governor's Island: The Cause Collective creates a floating poem inspired by Andy Warhol's balloon piece, 'Silver Clouds.'
Julia Furlan
On Governor's Island: The Cause Collective creates a floating poem inspired by Andy Warhol's balloon piece, 'Silver Clouds.'

Tags:

More in:

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Sponsored

About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

Feeds

Supported by