Streams

Redeemers: Ideas and Power in Latin America

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Enrique Krauze, director of Clio TV Productions, editor-in-chief of Letras Libres magazine and author of Redeemers: Ideas and Power in Latin America, discusses the parallels between news from Latin America—including from Chile, Mexico, Cuba and Venezuela—and ideas from Latin American history.

Guests:

Enrique Krauze
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Comments [6]

George G from New York, NY

It is amazing that no one talks about Batista and his regime when the matter of Cuba is spoken. Whilst I am not a fan of Castro, when you reconcile the history of Batista, and what he did to drive the people to Revolution against him and the Mafia that OWNED Havana under his watch, you have to ask yourself about this people that are so against Fidel. These are many too young to have had a say about their own recollection of anything political that happened then, or about the actions of their parents who supported that dictator--as if you hate Fidel, it means that you were all the way a Batista supporter. So which is worst? Would these Batista supporters be so eager to attack Fidel were they really to know about their history? If they indeed had an exercise of reconciling history and facts against fanatical opportunistic stories, they would know that the corrupt agents that supported Bastista and his dictatorship demanded the USA to invade Cuba, and that drove Fidel to an attitude of "¿Con que quieren joder? Pues vamos a joder" to ally with the USSR. Which Nation in the face that threat, would have not done the same? It is well known that Ché did not want the Soviets. Blame Fidel's Sovietization of Cuba on Washington DC, and the Mafia that ruled Havana, whose economic interests drove this mockery of "liberalization" of Cuba. They did not care who had the rule of government in Cuba. They just cared about their money and properties that Fidel nationalized from these foreigners and the collaborators that helped them run amock. If your parents were suporters of Batista and this Mafia that ruled Havana, it is very dubious the claims that you have about the property that you claim you own. Did your family obtain it by the same corruption that sustained Batista in power for so many years? "Ladrón no sabe para quién roba". The Cuban people, those that have had to bear the Castro regime, will have a chance to own the property that they have maintained, work and live for almost 60 years. They never left, they stay behind; it is their property now. What do you want with it? Do the same thing I heard in radio some of you accuse your compatriots what they will do: Sell it to Europeans and other foreign millonaires? "Ladrón juzga por su condición".

Aug. 16 2011 12:09 PM
ana maria from brooklyn, ny

A culture devoid of transcendentalism is the cause of youth riots in Chile and Europe? I can't decide if the author is an idiot, ignorant, or a neo-liberal propagandist? Protestors in Chile are not spoiled teens asking for free education, as the author implies. Chile's education system is underfunded and unequal--barring many lower income families from access to higher education. Chile has one of the highest rates of income inequality, trailing many developing nations, including Mexico--despite being a supposed economic miracle. 19% of its population live in poverty. Tell them that access to education is a silly reason to protest.
These protests, in Latin America and in Europe have nothing to do with a spiritually devoid culture. This is an unbelievably patronizing attitude to have. Young people are righteously angry about their very bleak prospects, which are the result of policies that favor the rich, while destroying our economy.

Aug. 16 2011 12:03 PM
Sebastian Polanco from Newark NJ

There is nothing like WNYC or NPR in ANY latinamerican country; is not just Venezuela. Regarding education and progress in Chile, of the 65 countries that participated in the PISA tests, Chile ranked 64th in terms of segregation across social classes in its schools and colleges.

Aug. 16 2011 11:48 AM
john from office

I thought Castro was a hero to the American left?? along with Mr. Chavez. What happened??,, oh eyes were opened!

Aug. 16 2011 11:45 AM
Jeff from NYC

The the host actually say to a caller, "And you have the great honor" to be on the air with the guest? Oh, my....

Aug. 16 2011 11:38 AM
Eubie from Manhattan

Jami - Two calls in a row about property in Cuba! Can we get back to the topic of Mr. Krauze's book?

Aug. 16 2011 11:36 AM

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