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Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics

Friday, August 12, 2011

How much do parents really matter? And are we sure winners never quit and quitters never win? Stephen J. Dubner, host of Freakonomics Radio and co-author, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics, talks about the unexpected economics behind issues like parenthood and quitting.

Guests:

Stephen J. Dubner
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Comments [6]

Rich from New Jersey

My kids are quirky, nerdy, chatty, smart, information-obsessed, indifferent to sports and social status, and likely to want to talk about really obscure, weird things. They know very few kids who can relate to them. In a case like that, like-minded parents are a much bigger influence.

Aug. 12 2011 10:55 AM
Amy from Manhattan

Why is Romania considering legal penalties for bad predictions by fortunetellers but not by economists? Well, fortunetelling is associated with Roma/Gypsies, & just a guess here--economics isn't.

Aug. 12 2011 10:48 AM
Amy from Manhattan

Maybe the more earning power parents have, the more time they can afford to spend with their kids.

Aug. 12 2011 10:44 AM
Rich from New Jersey

My kids are quirky, nerdy, chatty, smart, information-obsessed, indifferent to sports and social status, and likely to want to talk about really obscure, weird things. They know very few kids who can relate to them. In a case like that, like-minded parents are a much bigger influence.

Aug. 12 2011 10:43 AM
Tony

I thought the weather forecast was done nationally, and the people on TV are just parrots.

Aug. 12 2011 10:32 AM
Eric from bklyn


Love the Freakonomics podcast.

Since Stephen and Steven are so interested in using hard statistical data to drive their decisions, I wonder if they support, in theory at least, the idea of 'science-based government'.

Aug. 12 2011 10:26 AM

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