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Mystics and the Mediterranean (Podcast Edition)

Friday, August 05, 2011

WNYC

For this New Sounds, we’ll sample liberally from the latest recording from Moroccan-born singer Amina Alaoui, called “Arco Iris.”  It’s a pan-Mediterranean blend of flamenco music from Spain, fado music from Portugal, Arab-Andalusian music and Brazilian choro, linked by jazz and a night in Tunisia.

Alaoui’s ensemble includes José Luis Montón from Barcelona, Brazilian-born mandolinist Eduardo Miranda, along with two Tunisians: violinist Saïfallah Ben Abderrazak and oud player Sofiane Negra.  Idriss Agnel, Amina’s son, plays percussion.  We’ll also dip into her previous collaboration with Norwegian keyboardist Jon Balke and trumpeter Jon Hassell, and much more.

PROGRAM #3223  “Mystics + The Mediterranean” 

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

Jon Balke feat. Amina Alaoui

Siwan

Toda ciencia transcendiendo, excerpt [2:00]

ECM Records # 2042**

www.ecmrecords.com

Savina Yannatou

Sumiglia

Me To Fegari Perpato (With the Moon I'm Walking) [2:39]

ECM Records #1903, see above.

Amina Alaoui

Arco Iris

 

Ya laylo layl  [9:18]

ECM Records # 2180, see above.

Jon Balke feat. Amina Alaoui

Siwan

Toda ciencia transcendiendo [12:21]

ECM Records #2042

Amina Alaoui

Arco Iris

 

Buscante en Mi, var. [5:32]

ECM Records

See above

Jon Hassell

Last Night the Moon Came Dropping Its Clothes in the Street

Last Night the Moon Came [11:15]

ECM Records #2077, see above.

Savina Yannatou

Sumiglia

Porondos Viz Partjan [4:09]

ECM Records

See above

 

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