Streams

State vs. Defense

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Stephen Glain examines the tension between the diplomats in the State Department and the warriors at Defense. In his book State vs. Defense: The Battle to Define America's Empire, Glain profiles the figures who crafted American foreign policy, from George Marshall to Robert McNamara to Henry Kissinger to Don Rumsfeld, in order to reveal why he sees America becoming increasingly imperial and militaristic, and why he thinks it will lead to our financial peril.

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Stephen Glain
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Comments [12]

Ellie from Brooklyn

for the group:
Pakistan recieves the greatest cut of the foreign aid pie. Is this foreign aid considered defense spending, which constitutes 20% of the budget? And if not, shouldn't it be? In other words, how much greater would our budgetary allocation to defense be if we included foreign aid used to help secure America - either directly or indirectly - as is clearly the case with Pakistan?

Aug. 09 2011 12:46 PM

Did we really pay for our wars this decade?
I heard on the Diane Rehm that they were paid for properly. I thought they weren't....

Aug. 09 2011 12:44 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Bottom line is, that if the US totally withdraws from the world back into its national borders, as was the case after WWI, then every country will go nuclear, starting with Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, you name it. Israel went nuclear a long time ago.

If the US withdraws from the world, we will have 40 nuclear powers instead of 7 in no time flat!

Aug. 09 2011 12:44 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Hillary Clinton's vote on the Iraq invasion was based on the false info supplied by the Bush administration, & she said that if she'd known the truth at the time she wouldn't have voted for it (although she didn't apologize for it). I wouldn't say that made her a supporter of the war.

Aug. 09 2011 12:43 PM
Patrick from Newark

Why do we keep calling Social Security an entitelment? That is, don't I pay into it for my own benefit? Like a personal savings account?

Aug. 09 2011 12:43 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

Taiwan can defend itself with nuclear weapons, as can Israel. It all depends on how many nuclear states we want to spring up. That will be the price of a US withdrawal from its role as world's policeman since WWII.

Aug. 09 2011 12:41 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Did Lyndon Johnson ever regret his decision not to run again after seeing what Richard Nixon did?

Aug. 09 2011 12:36 PM
archie from midtown NY

My rant...
An interesting and important topic to be sure. But I am distracted and cringe everything he says "nuke cu lar"!!!! Why can't educated "experts" like this author pronounce this word right! Would he say "irregardless" !?

Aug. 09 2011 12:31 PM
Jon from Manhattan

While I'm definitely not a militarist, one must recognize the benefits from military research and development including but hardly limited to the Internet.

Aug. 09 2011 12:24 PM
jgarbuz from Queens

The attack by North Korea on South Korea was Stalin's attempt to probe, to see what the Americans would do in response.

My Brooklyn College teacher of Military History back in the late 1960s, was the Chief of Staff of the Hungarian army at that time, i.e. 1950, and he had very intimate knowledge that Stalin was behind the attack.

Aug. 09 2011 12:19 PM

The Carter administration tried to draw the Soviets into Afghanistan (by funding the Mujahideen). When the Soviets invaded, Brzezinski said to Carter, "We have given the Soviets their Vietnam."

Aug. 09 2011 12:18 PM
Patrick from Bronx

The Rumsfeld/Powell era offered a famous showdown between Donald Rumsfeld and Colin Powell during the Presidency of George W. Bush. Is there any sign that the relationship between Leon Panetta and Hillary Clinton would possibly compare to the fireworks of Rumsfeld/Powell?

Aug. 09 2011 05:12 AM

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