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Making Robots Human

Friday, July 22, 2011

Photographer Max Aguilera-Hellweg and Siddhartha Srinivasa, Professor at the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, talk about the future of robots and how robots are becoming more human. Max Aguilera-Hellweg took the photographs for the article “Making Robots Human,” in the August issue of National Geographic magazine, and Siddhartha Srinivasa is featured in the story. With advances in technology that allow robots to speak, blink, smile and perform such tasks as folding clothes and cooking, questions are being raised as to how human is too human. They explore how much everyday human function we want to outsource to machines, how the robot revolution will change the way we relate to each other, and if we’re ready for robots.

© Max Aguilera-Hellweg/National Geographic
HERB a robot being developed by Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with Intel Labs Pittsburgh is a prototype service bot that might care for the elderly and disabled in the not too distant fu

Long caption: All of these images are included in the August 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine, on newsstands July 26.
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/08/robots/robots-photography

© Max Aguilera-Hellweg/National Geographic
At Carnegie Mellon University the robot Actroid-DER took a crash course in becoming more human.

All of these images are included in the August 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine, on newsstands July 26.
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/08/robots/robots-photography

© Max Aguilera-Hellweg/National Geographic
With no human coach at the controls, Virginia Tech's robot soccer team dribbled, passed, and scored its way into the 2010 RoboCup "kid-size" semifinal in Singapore.

The tournament founders' goal is a robot team that will defeat the human World Cup champs by 2050.

All of these images are included in the August 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine, on newsstands July 26.
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/08/robots/robots-photography 

National Geographic
The August Issue of National Geographic Magazine

All of these images are included in the August 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine, on newsstands July 26.
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/08/robots/robots-photography

© Max Aguilera-Hellweg/National Geographic
Ready to fire bullets and hurl grenades, a Modular Advanced Armed Robotic System, operated by a soldier behind cover, rolls into action in a training setup at Fort Benning , Georgia.

Future military robots endowed with ethical programs might be able to decide on their own when, and at whom, to shoot.

All of these images are included in the August 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine, on newsstands July 26.
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/08/robots/robots-photography 

Guests:

Max Aguilera-Hellweg and Siddhartha Srinivasa
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Comments [9]

michael from Brooklyn

Are any of the scientists working on robots thinking of the environmental impact? How are they powered - by toxic laden batteries?
Electricity generated from fossil fuels?
What kind of materials are they made from, and how environmentally friendly is the industrial process by which they are made?
Man never gave much thought to the environmental impact of the automobile as it was developed and became mainstream. Will the same happen with robotics? It's easy to think that robotic science is a creative field, but lets not lose sight of the fact that such creative efforts are ultimately more destructive in the long run.

Jul. 22 2011 12:52 PM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

Watch: Social Robots (NOVA Science NOW)
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/social-robots.html

Jul. 22 2011 12:48 PM
mgw from Brooklyn

Will no one bring up the problem of robots needing old people's medicine for food? When they grab you with those metal claws, you can't break free.

Jul. 22 2011 12:44 PM
Robots Need to Party from NYC

Boston Dynamics' Big Dog robot is unbelievable. Not in the "humanoid" category but certainly evokes an emotional response when seen in action.

Jul. 22 2011 12:43 PM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

omg...

Of COURSE digital allows for different styles...just as 35mm did...and color did and photography itself (all developments that ALSO caused worry about what was "lost" etc, etc in their time)

It's the INDIVIDUAL that produces unique work, not the tool.

Jeeeez....

Jul. 22 2011 12:41 PM
Hal

Explain how a computer program becomes 'confused'.

You might suggest that a light switch is 'confused' when you try to move it from side to side rather than up and down.

Jul. 22 2011 12:34 PM
angela cason

1.as we depopulate over the next century, robots will fill a vital gap.
2. What was the camp he mentioned got kids? Thanks

Jul. 22 2011 12:26 PM
Amy from Manhattan

Would robots have lights where we'd expect eyes, or cameras? It makes sense to me to have visual input where people would expect to see eyes, esp. in "relatable" robots that are programmed to interpret facial expressions, so the people they interact with look at the right place to let the robot see their expressions.

Jul. 22 2011 12:25 PM
DarkSymbolist from NYC!

"Replicants"?, lol.
That didn't turn out so well in Bladerunner

Jul. 22 2011 12:14 PM

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