Streams

The New School Unveils Restored Camilo Egas Mural

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

A panoramic view of Camilo Egas' newly restored mural, 'Harvest Festival, Ecuador.' A panoramic view of Camilo Egas' newly restored mural, "Harvest Festival, Ecuador." (Martin Seck/The New School)

After six years of planning and restoration, “Ecuadorian Festival,” created by the artist and educator Camilo Egas in 1932, has been unveiled at The New School’s Sheila C. Johnson Design Center. The 17-foot long mural is part of The New School’s “(re)collection” exhibition, which features some 40 archived works from The New School’s art collection of 2,000 objects.

The sepia-toned oil-on-canvas piece, which had been on the wall facing the Joseph Urban Building's Martha Graham dance studio, depicts a procession of indigenous dancers at a dance festival. The mural was originally commissioned by the university for the building along with works by José Clemente Orozco and Thomas Hart Benton, the former of which was featured at last year’s "Re-Imagining Orozco" exhibition.

“Art was meant to be embedded in that building,” said New School Art Collection curator Sylvia Rocciolo, adding that the triad of work was the “DNA of the collection.” Egas also served as the school’s first director of the fine arts department.

After “(re)collection” ends its run at the Design Center on September 7, “Ecuadorian Festival” will return to its original location, with the possibility of installing it on a more prominent wall in one of the university’s 15 buildings.

Check out the slideshow below for images of other pieces featured at The New School’s “(re)collection” exhibition.

Egas' mural is featured with some 40 other pieces from The New School's art collection as part of the university's
Erica Getto/WNYC
Egas' mural is featured with some 40 other pieces from The New School's art collection as part of the university's "(re)collection" exhibition.
A wide shot of the gallery at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center.
Martin Seck/The New School/WNYC
A wide shot of the gallery at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center.
A close-up of Egas' mural.
Luna Lin/WNYC
A close-up of Egas' mural.
The New School possesses over 2,000 works displayed throughout its 15 buildings. This enlarged photo depicts pieces that, for the moment, are in storage.
Erica Getto/WNYC
The New School possesses over 2,000 works displayed throughout its 15 buildings. This enlarged photo depicts pieces that, for the moment, are in storage.
Enrique Chagoya's 2004
Erica Getto/WNYC
Enrique Chagoya's 2004 "Ghost of Liberty" is one of the pieces on display at The New Schools "(re)collection" exhibition.
Francois Azambourg's 2011
Luna Lin/WNYC
Francois Azambourg's 2011 "Douglas Jar" display features four glass jars and the wood mold with which they were constructed.
This 1995 piece by Roxy Paine, entitled
Luna Lin/WNYC
This 1995 piece by Roxy Paine, entitled "Plug-in Painting" features 39 broad brushstrokes on both the canvas and the floor.
From L to R: Sister Mary Corita Kent's 1969
Erica Getto/WNYC
From L to R: Sister Mary Corita Kent's 1969 "manflowers"; Klaus Mosettig's 2008 "Untitled 1950"; Shirin Neshat, Izhar Patkin, & Rafael Fuchs' 2006 "Untitled"; Marjetica Potrc's 2001 "Bear Falling"
Some of the featured works were once in offices and hallways at The New School's buildings until they were deemed offensive and removed.
Erica Getto/WNYC
Some of the featured works were once in offices and hallways at The New School's buildings until they were deemed offensive and removed.
One such piece that was removed is Peter Saul's 1975
Erica Getto/WNYC
One such piece that was removed is Peter Saul's 1975 "Amboosh: Typicul Veet Nam."
Two tables featuring documents and other papers that not only tell the story of The New School's acquisition of the Egas mural but also the history of the university itself.
Erica Getto
Two tables featuring documents and other papers that not only tell the story of The New School's acquisition of the Egas mural but also the history of the university itself.
A close-up of one of the tables reveals photographs and documents that reflect the history of The New School's art collection and that of the university itself.
Erica Getto
A close-up of one of the tables reveals photographs and documents that reflect the history of The New School's art collection and that of the university itself.

Tags:

More in:

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.

Sponsored

Feeds

Supported by