Streams

Friendship, Murder, and the Search for Truth in the Arab World

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Joseph Braude discusses his time embedded with a hardened unit of detectives in Casablanca who handle everything from busting al-Qaeda cells to solving homicides. The Honored Dead: A Story of Friendship, Murder, and the Search for Truth in the Arab World tells the story of a seemingly commonplace murder of a young guard at a warehouse. Braude’s pursuit of the truth behind the murder takes him from cosmopolitan Marrakesh to the Berber heartland, from the homes of the wealthiest and most powerful people in the country to the backstreets of Casablanca.

Guests:

Joseph Braude
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Comments [2]

jgarbuz from Queens

In fact, many Berber tribes once converted to Judaism, and one Jewish Berber queen fought valiantly against the Arab conquerors. Most Moros became Muslims. Jews were in Morocco a very long time ago, perhaps as far back as the time of the Israelites and Phoenicians. When Muslim Moros invaded Christian Visigoth Spain, the Jews who had been mistreated by the Visigoths sided with the Moros and helped them gain control, beginning the great Cordoban culture that lasted for centuries. When the Christians regained control, both Muslims and Jews were forced either to convert or to leave Spain in 1492. A year that began the rise of a brand new civilization across the vast ocean.

Jul. 12 2011 01:04 PM

What an interesting story,It would make an interesting film because it takes in so much about other cultures.

Jul. 12 2011 01:02 PM

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