Streams

A Break from the Ubiquitousness of the Coffee Shop: The Tea Salon

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

WNYC
Happy Discovery: The Bosie Tea Salon on Morton Street, in dappled sunlight. (Amy Eddings/WNYC)

Since giving up decaf coffee 16 days ago, I've found it tough to enjoy coffee shops. The delicious smell of the roasted coffee is a distraction. And it's hard not to feel deprived when looking at a menu board full of coffee options (cappuccino, espresso, americano, red eye, latte), but little to say about tea except "black" and "herbal."

So I was delighted to stumble upon the Bosie Tea Parlor on Morton Street in the West Village while on my way to work this afternoon. Its walls were lined with beautiful, big tins of teas. There was an intriguing glass case filled with macaroons (the French kind, not the coconut American kind), but I ignored them.

(Can I just tell you that this is a MINOR MIRACLE? I IGNORED THE PASTRIES. My taste buds and food choices have shifted, without a lot of drama and angst, just by eliminating sugar, flour and other gluten grains from my diet.)

Even better, Bosie had a "house specialty" of matcha (finely-ground green tea) and steamed, unsweetened almond milk. The server brought it to me in a bowl, big enough for my two hands to cup. The matcha made beautiful green swirls in the light beige almond milk foam. (Sorry, I drank it all before realizing I should have taken a picture of it. Next time.)

It was warm and soothing and creamy ... all the qualities I love about coffee, and have missed while drinking herbal teas.

Later, as I was waiting for the elevator to take me up to the studios, I felt a moment of complete joy and bliss and in-the-momentness. I can't say it was the matcha, though it has anti-oxidants and other healthy properties. 

It was the thrill of doing the work of making big changes in my little life, and finding Life meeting me more than half way.

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