Streams

Google Helps Brooklyn Artist Bring New Founding Father to Life

Monday, July 04, 2011

For Brooklyn artist Kenseth Armstead, the discovery of a founding father that history forgot began with a Google search of his own name. In 2004, Armstead stumbled on the story of a slave-turned-spy who lived during the American Revolution. James Armistead Lafayette was no relation, but he was the inspiration for Kenseth Armstead's graphic novel. The graphite-on-paper drawings from the book are on view as part of a show called "SPOOK: Invocation" at the LMAKprojects gallery.

The show is Armstead's first solo gallery exhibition in New York. He said he turned James Armistead Lafayette's story into a graphic novel rather than a film because it was way more cost effective.

"I had written a screenplay, but I could not raise $20 million, oddly enough," Armstead joked of one of the projects previous iterations. "I think it's an amazing story, a lot of people think it's an amazing story, but to make a story like this in a film, the budget would be a cast of thousands."

"SPOOK: Invocation" is on view at LMAKprojects in the Lower East Side through August 1.

Courtesy of Kenseth Armstead
"Muzzle Mouth" by Kenseth Armstead
Armstead's photos on the wall of the gallery at LMAKprojects. The gallery is open from 11 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday through Friday, or by appointment.
Courtesy of the artist and LMAKprojects
Installation view of "SPOOK: Invocation" at LMAKprojects. The gallery is open from 11 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday through Friday, or by appointment.
Courtesy of Kenseth Armstead
"Tents" by Kenseth Armstead
Courtesy of Kenseth Armstead
"James Meets Lafayette" by Kenseth Armstead
Courtesy of Kenseth Armstead
"Night Run" by Kenseth Armstead
Courtesy of Kenseth Armstead
"Bloody Chitterlings" by Kenseth Armstead

Tags:

More in:

Comments [1]

John Cote

This sounds wonderful.

Hero stories being wonderful, the majority of us are not heroic or come to it as absolute last resort. A different type of (web)comic, KINGJAMESMONEEGO.com deals with a complex protaganist named Moneego, Jim Bowie and pirate Jean Lafitte.

Jul. 05 2011 09:42 AM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Get the WNYC Morning Brief in your inbox.
We'll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Sponsored

Feeds

Supported by