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Summer Shakespeare: Coming to a Subway Car, Park or Parking Lot Near You

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Isake Smith was first in line for tickets. At 22, Smith has been going to Shakespeare in the Park each year for nearly half of her life. Isake Smith was first in line for tickets. At 22, Smith has been going to Shakespeare in the Park each year for nearly half of her life. (Julia Furlan/WNYC)

Summer in New York City can smell like garbage and barbecues, but it sounds like the 17th century. "Hither" and "thither," the Bard's plays dominate the city's subway cars, parking lots and parks while air conditioning units are working overtime.

The tradition of free outdoor performances of Shakespeare in New York City dates back to the late 1950’s, according to Columbia University Shakespeare professor Jim Shapiro, and exists in large part thanks to the efforts Joseph Papp, founder of the Public Theater.

"This guy just hammered away and broke down resistance to this and succeeded," said Shapiro.

And so, the Public Theater's Shakespeare in the Park was born. Each year, the lines for free tickets to the often star-studded presentations of Shakespeare snake from the Delacorte Theater in Central Park neatly down the park's concrete paths. According to Shapiro, waiting for tickets over a picnic lunch before catching a show in the evening is a quintessential New York experience.

"We’ve done it ever since the '60s," said Norm Gordon, who sat at the front of the senior's line on Tuesday to watch this year's production of "Measure for Measure." Gordon's Mets cap shaded his eyes while he killed time watching a family of birds nesting above the theater's ticket counter. "Now that we’re over 65 we have a special place to wait, so it’s a little easier. It’s a long wait, but it's worth it."

A family passes the time in line with a game of Uno.Others waiting in line languorously stretched out and enjoyed a game of Uno or a kung fu lesson. The cachê of Shakespeare in the Park is, for many, worth braving hours in line or even missing a day of work.

"It’s not really summer to me without Shakespeare in the Park," said Isake Smith, who arrived before 5 A.M. on Tuesday to claim her pair of tickets. It was her first time being first in line in eight consecutive years of attending.

"Sometimes you get here at 5 A.M. and there are people stretched around the corner," she said. "Sometimes I get here at 9 A.M. and I can still get tickets, so it really depends."

For all the snacking and relaxation that happens in the ticket line, Columbia Professor JimSam Michael and Derek Kleinbaum take some time to perfect their kung fu.Shapiro said that producing Shakespeare outdoors is a huge challenge.

"Staging Shakespeare in Central Park is like staging a Beatles concert in Shea Stadium," he said. "Energy, sound and tension all drift away over the great field and it's a large stage."

In addition, he said, the actors work double-time to conceal the venue's biggest menace.

"I don’t know whether the mosquitoes have something against Shakespeare, but they are flying into the eyes, noses and mouths of these actors," Shapiro said. "It is heroic, it is unsung and it does not happen on Broadway."

Smaller companies with fewer or no marquee names also spend their summer months cashing in on the popularity of Shakespeare in the Park by staging productions across the five boroughs.

"It gives younger actors a chance to strut their stuff," he said. "You can do Shakespeare outdoors without a home, without renting the space. It brings costs down considerably."

Shapiro also said there was a historical precedent for Shakespeare in the summer. The playwright's own theater company fought hard to get an indoor theater, finally succeeding in 1608 with its Black Friar's theater. But when the summer rolled around, the Black Friar's closed.

"They performed at the Globe [Theater] outside," he said. "Even back then, people liked Shakespeare outdoors in the summer." 

Not in the mood to wait in line? Here are some of this year's other Shakespeare offerings in the city.

"Henry V" in St. Nicholas Park The Manhattan Shakespeare Project isn't leaving the gender-bending to the Bard. With this all-female production of "Henry V," the company will likely live up to its tagline: "We're cute. We're talented. We play with swords." In Harlem, from July 6th through 8th at 6 P.M. (If Harlem's not convenient, the troupe will perform in Brooklyn's Sunset Park on July 14th and 15th at 7 P.M.)

 "Henry V" in Battery Park and Governor's Island Being on a boat is pretty fantastic in the summer, but pretending it's the English Channel and getting some marine entertainment makes this New York Classical Theater production of "Henry V" extra exciting. Performances leave from the aptly-named Castle Clinton in Battery Park and head to Governor's Island for the exciting Battle of Agincourt on July 6, 8-10, 12, 13, 15, 18-21 and 24 at 7 P.M.

"Much Ado About Nothing" in Central Park If Shakespeare in the Park's offerings don't pique your interest, the Boomerang theater company will have performances just a few minutes' walk from the Delacorte Theater. Near the 69th Street entrance, the company will give one of Shakespeare's best-loved plays the Off-Off Broadway treatment on July 9th, 10th, 16th and 17th at 2 P.M. In Manhattan.

"The Comedy of Errors" in the Municipal Parking Lot at Broome and Ludlow It's the 20th season of the city's most cleverly-named celebration of the Bard. "Shakespeare in the Park(ing Lot)" puts on "The Comedy of Errors" in a modern-day pizzeria in Little Italy, featuring actors clad in loud printed shirts and the occasional bowler hat. If it sounds like the height of hipster schtick, just remember that the tradition is older than many of the legions parked in the coffee shops of Williamsburg. Plus, a little youthful enthusiasm never hurt a theatrical tradition. Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 P.M. from July 7th through 23rd. In Manhattan.

Scenes from "Macbeth," "Romeo and Juliet" and "King Lear" on the L, R, F, G, J, M and Z trains Paul Marino and Fred Jones' take on free summer Shakespeare is a little more, uh, underground. The two actors take their audiences captive by diving into scenes between announcements to "stand clear of the closing doors, please." Their performance schedule is left to chance, but don't be alarmed if you catch some high drama of the classical ilk while straphanging Thursday and Friday evenings and Saturdays and Sundays before 2 P.M.

Most summer days, the line for Shakespeare in the Park wends down the concrete path. Still, everyone in line was able to get a ticket for
Julia Furlan/WNYC
Most summer days, the line for Shakespeare in the Park winds down the concrete path. Still, everyone in line was able to get a ticket for "Measure for Measure" on Tuesday, June 28.
Elizabeth Cassarino arrived at 7 A.M. to get Shakespeare in the Park tickets and was fifth in line.
Julia Furlan/WNYC
Elizabeth Cassarino arrived at 7 A.M. to get Shakespeare in the Park tickets and was fifth in line.

"Central Park is dangerous, but I make an exception for Shakespeare," Cassarino said. "I come a little later when the sun is shining so I don't get mugged or killed."

Sam Michael took the opportunity to do some impromptu yoga accompanied by fellow line-sitters Derek Kleinbaum, Aleeza Chanowitz, Gabrielle Miller, Malka Wallick and Max Lenik.
Julia Furlan/WNYC
Sam Michael did some impromptu yoga accompanied by fellow line-sitters Derek Kleinbaum, Aleeza Chanowitz, Gabrielle Miller and Malka Wallick.

Chanowitz is moving to Israel in August and was distributing cake to employees and neighbors in line from her going away party. "I've got to get in as much New York as possible," said the Flatbush, Brooklyn native. 

A little kung fu was in order, as well. Derek Kleinbaum showed Sam Michael some moves while Michael's son slept in a stroller nearby.
Julia Furlan/WNYC
A little kung fu was in order, as well. Derek Kleinbaum showed Sam Michael some moves while Michael's son slept in a stroller nearby.
Seniors over the age of 65 were the first to get tickets.
Julia Furlan/WNYC
Seniors over the age of 65 were the first to get tickets.

Norm Gordon, pictured here in his Mets cap, has seen stars like James Earl Jones and Meryl Streep at Shakespeare in the Park shows. He has also seen both Al Pacino (last year) and George C. Scott (in 1962) in versions of "The Merchant of Venice."

Julia Furlan/WNYC
"I love getting carded!" exclaimed Jackie Melissas (pictured in her hat) when an organizer asked the seniors for proof of their age.
Martin Jennings moved his music stand and flute along as the line moved. When the line dwindled to only a few people, he decided to get a pair of tickets, as well.
Julia Furlan/WNYC
Martin Jennings moved his music stand and flute along as the line moved. When the line dwindled to only a few people, he decided to get a pair of tickets, as well.
The line for Shakespeare in the Park tickets moved along at a clip an hour after tickets began being distributed.
Julia Furlan/WNYC
The line for Shakespeare in the Park tickets moved along at a clip an hour after tickets began being distributed. "Measure for Measure" officially opens June 30.

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Comments [2]

W. Koehnsen from New Jersey

Shela, hello. Thank you for your information about where to see Greek plays. I'm there!

Without the Greeks and Ovid's beautiful creation myths, Shakespeare would have had a tougher time creating his own works of genius. I for one prefer Greek tragedy over Shakespeare or anything that came after, but I would offer the possibility that the complicated choruses seem anachronistic to modern audiences who seem sometimes unsure about what to make of them. In addition, the themes and travails of the heroes in Shakespeare are less opaque than some of what occurs in Greek tragedy. (e.g., All the concern about unburied bodies; Orestes being chased by the Furies even as Orestes' own crime is understandable; and kicking your best archer off of the ship because his foot smells worse than anything dropped by the horses and cattle in the Augean stables!)

Jul. 10 2011 09:10 AM
Shela Xoregos from Manhattan

Oh, oh, oh: no one could, should or would prove Shakespeare isn't the greatest playwright. However, to ignore other classical playwrights such as Corneille, Sheridan, Moliere and in particular, the Greeks, is
somewhat shocking. Xoregos Performing Company did MEDEA last July in free performances and we are now preparing ANTIGONE for 13 performances in four boroughs opening July 23. These powerful plays cannot compete with Shakespeare's poetry and elegant writing but they are compelling theater and speak of mankind. There are other classical playwrights being done this and other summers. xoregos.tumblr.com for our schedule. Equal rights to the Greeks!

Jul. 09 2011 09:47 AM

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