Streams

Episode #3056

ETHEL Plays Jacob TV, I

« previous episode | next episode »

Friday, June 24, 2011

For this New Sounds, experience the music of Dutch composer, JacobTV, (Jacob Ter Veldhuis) who is something of an outlaw in the established modern classical music scene. Listen to the quartet ETHEL perform new versions of TV's works specially arranged for and dedicated to them, as recorded at a New Sounds Live Concert event at Merkin Hall in 2010.  (Part 1 of 2.)

One of the most performed European composers, TV's rock band past converged with his time spent at conservatory, lately weaving American media (yes, even Jerry Springer) and world events into his works.

PROGRAM # 3056, NS Live: Ethel plays music of Jacob TV (First aired on 3/30/2010)

ARTIST(S)

RECORDING

CUT(S)

SOURCE

Ethel

New Sounds Live at Merkin Hall, March 11, 2010

Jacob TV: Capriccio [4:00]
Jacob TV: Jesus Is Coming [9:00]
Jacob TV: Syracuse Blues [4:00]
Jacob TV: String Quartet #3 – There Must Be Some Way Out Of Here [17:00]

These performances not commercially available. Jacob TV (Jacob ter Veldhuis) has numerous recordings available. “Jesus Is Coming” appears in a sax quartet version on the album Pitch Black, www.innova.mu *. The string quartet Ethel has numerous CDs as well: info at www.ethelcentral.com

Post-Minimalist Music (Special Podcast)

Philip Glass’s piano works have had a longstanding and widespread influence – on the so-called Post-minimalist composers, but also on musicians working in the electronic dance world.  One of them is Francesco Tristano, who brings electronica’s repeating motifs back to the piano in his solo piece “The Melody.”  We’ll hear that, as well as several of William Duckworth’s “Time Curve Preludes,” often considered the first major Post-minimalist work, and a work from the late Canadian composer Ann Southam directly inspired by Glass’s piano works.

Comment

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.