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Wednesday, June 08, 2011

ENVIRONMENT
Governor Christie Plans Cuts to Renewable Energy Goals (NYT)
Governor Christie announced Tuesday that he plans to scale back New Jersey’s 10-year energy master plan, saying that its renewable energy goals are too aggressive. Under the revision, only 22.5 percent of electricity will come from solar and wind power by 2021. The original plan called for 30 percent. Additionally, more electricity will come from natural gas. Public hearings will be held before the plan is finalized.

POLITICS
Mayor Bloomberg Sort of, Kind of, Endorses Quinn for Mayor (WSJ)
Former Mayor Ed Koch told the Wall Street Journal that Mayor Bloomberg told him he would endorse City Council Speaker Christine Quinn for mayor in 2013. When the paper reached out to Bloomberg to confirm, Koch called them back and said, he’s heard from people “around” the mayor that he’s “leaning towards” Quinn. Quinn isn’t commenting.

POLITICS
Huma Isn’t Leaving Anthony (WSJ)
The paper takes a look at the intensely private life of Huma Abedin, wife of Rep. Anthony Weiner. Because of her job as a deputy chief of staff to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, she’s been able to avoid being a “political wife.” Now that her husband is involved in a sex scandal, the spotlight is on. And that means there’ll be a lot more stories where people “close to the couple” comment anonymously about the state of her marriage. “A person close to the couple” says she’s not leaving him. Meanwhile, political analysts debate which probable mayoral candidate benefits the most from Weiner’s implosion.

POLITICS
New Ethics Law Could Be Challenged in Court (WSJ)
The main issue concerns enshrining into law the dominance of the Republican and Democratic parties. Only members from those parties will be able to appoint those who serve on the proposed Joint Commission on Public Ethics, which effectively leaves out independents and other third parties.

CRIME
Ticket-Fixing Probe Focuses on Police Union (NY Daily News)
Prosecutors investigating alleged ticket-fixing within the police department are reportedly narrowing their focus on the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association. Prosecutors offered immunity to some 40 police officers to get them to testify against union officials. The Bronx DA lost two cases where ticket-fixing cops were witnesses. They’ve apparently turned to offering more “sweetheart” deals in order to keep officers who’ve engaged in the practice off the witness stand.

BUSINESS
New York City Is Ready For Its Close-Up (NY Post)
70 new movie and TV projects have come to New York state since January. They’re expected to inject $1 billion into the state economy and create at least 4,700 jobs in the city. Most of the city's projects are produced at Steiner Studios in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and Silvercup Studios and Kaufman Astoria Studios in Queens.

BUSINESS
Macy’s Workers Will Protest Pay and Benefit Cuts Today (Crain’s)
Union leaders say that since Macy’s is posting big profits, the retailer should not be considering cuts to pay and benefits. A union contract covering 4,000 workers at four New York City-area stores expires in a week, and employees will rally today to say they do not want the new contract to include concessions. Union officials say Macy’s wants changes to scheduling that would limit full-time shifts, seniority, and overtime hours.

REAL ESTATE
Two Brooklyn Businesses Sued by the State for Resisting Atlantic Yards Project (NY Daily News)
The owners of Storage Mart and Global Exhibition Services are refusing to let Ratner’s construction crews onto their properties to do work for the Atlantic Yards project. The owners say they fear damage to their buildings. Now the state is suing them. State officials say because of eminent domain laws, they can do the work whether or not the property owners agree.

REAL ESTATE
Landmarks Commission Prevents a Brownstone Made From Brownstone (Brooklyn Paper)
A Brooklyn developer who wants to build a modern townhouse with brownstone quarried from its original source has been stopped in his tracks. The Landmarks Preservation Commission called the proposed structure a “McMansion” in disguise and refused to allow the project because there are no other brownstones on the Brooklyn Heights block and the home would stick out like sore thumb.

CULTURE
Hasidic Rabbis Issue ‘Tank Top Ban’ for Women (Brooklyn Paper)
As temperatures creep into the 90s this week, Rabbis are papering telephone poles in South Williamsburg with flyers telling women not to wear tanks tops, clingy dresses, and T-shirts. The clothing ban is the latest edict from the Central Rabbinical Congress. In the past, the group of rabbis has instructed Hasidic women not to talk on cell phones and to move to the other side of the street when a man is approaching them on the sidewalk.

OPINION
Editorial: Obama Administration Enforces Immigration Laws Without Offering Alternatives (NYT)
Massachusetts is the latest state to drop out of the Secure Communities programs. The Times editorial board says the message is clear: The Obama Administration must abandon the program for “real immigration reform that combines a path to legality with necessary measures to secure our borders and deport real criminals who are here illegally."

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