Streams

WhiBi Conversations: What Makes a Good Performance?

Monday, February 22, 2010 - 02:37 PM

Vallejo Gantner suffers from performance envy. He directs a downtown theater, P.S. 122, and he's not all that happy that the museum world has become the "new cool" for seeing live art.

But is any of that art ... any good?

That's one of the questions art critic Carolina Miranda posed to Gantner and to Whitney Biennial co-curator Gary Carrion-Murayari. Gantner argues that few visual artists understand how to make performance work well in the "white box" of the museum. And while this year's Biennial features considerably less performance than the 2008 exhibition (which took over the Park Avenue Armory for three weeks), Carrion-Murayari argues that the work we'll see this year seemlessly fits into the show.

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Comments [2]

nobody fantastic from brooklyn

a hastily written thought,
The best performance work reflects out of behavioral identity politics of the '90s intertwined with american dark terror and hideousness of the our culture of the last decade. Its an irrational fusion at this time.

How does living immersed in image environ ent effect your behavior and mental picture? Performance is an exploration between behavior, image and belief. It is capable of cracking the encryption of lies that we are surrounded in. A painting never caused a revolution. you cant see the best performance work because it is supressed.

Feb. 26 2010 01:56 PM
Jody Oberfelder

I went to the Whitney Biennial Opening tonight. Would have loved to have seen more live performance. More art in more places. Theaters do provide a container--not a drive by experience. More challenging for the viewer perhaps.

Feb. 24 2010 11:22 PM

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