Streams

Fair Food for All

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

Oran B. Hesterman shows how our food system's dysfunctions are unintended consequences of our focus on efficiency, centralization, higher yields, profit, and convenience. He defines the new principles and the concrete steps necessary to restructure it. Fair Food: Growing a Healthy, Sustainable Food System for All introduces people and organizations across the country who are making a difference—from bringing fresh food to inner cities, to fighting for farm workers' rights, to putting cows back on the pastures where they belong. He provides practical information for how to get more involved.

Guests:

Oran B. Hesterman

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Comments [11]

anonyme

@maiza - real food costs real money. I didn't grow up with outrageous consumerism, I grew up with real food. Low prices actually undermine the food system - read Michael Pollan's Omnivore's Dilemma - this has nothing to do with elitism - you have to rise up and use your dollars in the market. You have to find ways to do it instead of grousing about someone else's irrelevant attitudes.

Jun. 02 2011 06:10 PM
anonyme

You can pay your farmer or you can pay your pharmacist later. You have to insist. You can form buying clubs. You can join csas. You can grow your own - you have to make priorities.

Jun. 02 2011 02:19 PM
eric

@illfg
you can look it up all over the internet
took me 5 seconds to find this

http://www.vegsource.com/articles/pimentel_water.htm

Jun. 01 2011 09:58 PM
Joan P. Fox-Bow from Bronx, NY

I am happy to say I am part of a HS community garden project in the South Bronx. A collaborative effort between Citizens Action Project, HealthCorps, Good Shepherd Services and University Heights HS through a generous donation from the Denihan hospitality group we have brought an enormous 11 beds to this neighborhood where there is little or no fresh food. HS students volunteer in the garden/farm and all sorts of classes come and assist and learn about sustainable gardening and good nutrition.

Jun. 01 2011 02:45 PM
monica from Warren NJ

Interesting except for one imp. remark: ASPHALT garden???? You are letting the kids get poisoned as the asphalt LEACHES into their garden soil!!!
P:lease alert them. !!!!!!!The rest of the reporting was most interesting.
Thank you.

Jun. 01 2011 02:04 PM

"eric - If the ground water depletion is a problem, why does no one talk about the meat industry and all the water it take to raise a cattle.. It takes 1000 gallons of water to raise burgers worth of cattle but 50 gallons for a potato. why is it so taboo to talk about the meat industry's part in the economic and political spectrum?"

please cite your sources as that kind of statement is disingenuous without sources.

Jun. 01 2011 02:03 PM

I certainly agree with Mr. Hesterman on the fact that America takes for granted the immigrants who plant/harvest/cook/deliver/serve the food we eat everyday. Those who want criminals deported should shift they focus to exactly that, people who are CRIMINALS, not those who work under the hot sun or in unconditioned kitchens, to make a little money to feed their families.

Jun. 01 2011 01:53 PM
DRG

The connection between food, and body and poverty must be addressed. Policy changes, like everything else - where we value humans. When my young and healthy brother had a heart attack. The first meal they gave him at the hospital? Steak! When our own healthcare system doesn't make the connection...we have a lot of work to do.

Jun. 01 2011 01:51 PM
maiza from brooklyn

It's hard to argue with the idea of good,healthy food for all...but why, oh, why do even the "loco-vore" movements have such snobbery and elitism attached to them--and don;t kid yourself, they do.
Some thoughtful lobbying and profit sacrifice are going to be necessary here..ah,what the heck, we're doomed anyway,so pass the bacon and ice cream!

Jun. 01 2011 01:48 PM
eric

If the ground water depletion is a problem, why does no one talk about the meat industry and all the water it take to raise a cattle.. It takes 1000 gallons of water to raise burgers worth of cattle but 50 gallons for a potato. why is it so taboo to talk about the meat industry's part in the economic and political spectrum?

Jun. 01 2011 01:46 PM

Another reason for food insecurity is low income. More & more seniors are now SocSec/Medicare-dependent.

As one, I can tell you that food insecurity is a monthly problem. It starts after paying rent & utilities & trying to pay for Rx drugs & personal care necessities.

Jun. 01 2011 01:42 PM

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