Streams

White Population Shrinks as Immigrants Increase in New Jersey Suburbs

Wednesday, May 25, 2011

The six New Jersey counties that lie across the Hudson River from New York are losing white residents, as well as young children and 20- and 30-somethings, according to the latest census data.

The region — Bergen, Hudson, Essex, Passaic, Union and Middlesex counties — collectively lost nearly 96,000 white residents over the last decade, and gained an even larger number of Asian and Mexican residents.

Several counties experienced a double-digit percentage loss of residents aged 25 to 44. Passaic County lost more than 10,000 residents between the ages of 35 and 44. Bergen County lost 23,302 residents in that age bracket.

Only Hudson county beat the region-wide trend, registering 10 percent growth in the number of residents aged 25 to 34.

In all but one of the six counties, the number of children age 9 or younger fell. Hudson County registered 5,428 fewer kids between the ages of 5 and 9, equal to a 14 percent decrease. The number of children below the age of 10 in Essex county fell by 10,407, equal to a 9 percent loss.

Some of the most dramatic demographic changes took place in Middlesex County, which gained 49,825 Asian Indian residents and 13,514 Mexican residents. The county's white population declined by 38,709, or 7.5 percent, but the overall county population grew by 8 percent.

The number of African Americans also grew in the suburbs: by 13 percent in Bergen, 15 percent in Middlesex and 9 percent in Union county.

In Bergen county, the Asian Indian population grew by 40 percent, while the Korean population grew by 58 percent and the Mexican population more than doubled, to 8,974, and the number of Puerto Ricans rose by 49 percent, to 25,786.

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Comments [4]

Don Vino

to RXN, life is too expensive in the northeast. Having more than 1-2 kids = being constantly broke!

Jul. 14 2011 08:25 AM
Variety Needed from here

I don't mind the new immigrants but it would be nice to see more variety than the usual suspects (Mexicans, Indians, Chinese). What about more representation from around the world, including Europe and Africa. Even more Eurasians would be interesting. Let's mix it up a little more.

May. 27 2011 11:20 PM
Huol from USA

As for the previous comment, I fail to see how this is a bad thing. So what if the white population decreases in a certain area, does that make the place any less American? Is it neccesarily worse off if less white people are there? If anything, the influx of immigrant is a great thing as they keep American society virbrant and dynamic, warding off the decadence seen in so many post-industrial Western countries.

What is unfortunate is that as more immigrants move in to this country, you'd think they'd be given more power and representation, especially since America is a nation founded and built by immigrants, yet such is not the case. More and more we see only reactionary politicians feeding on the insecurity and ill seated deep fears of the declining white population.

May. 26 2011 11:58 AM
RXN

Unfortunately, the American obsession with contraception, sterilization, and abortion is lowering our fertility rates and decreasing our young. Europe's crisis is even worse. Demography is Destiny, and we are sacrificing our young for our short-term gratification.

May. 26 2011 10:06 AM

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