Streams

This Week: Must-See Arts in the City

WNYC's Arts Datebook: May 26 - June 1

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 12:00 AM

WNYC

Hacked video games and remixed Internet videos at the Whitney, topless human-animal dancers at Jonathan Levine, a look at life in Cuba at Marlborough and some '60s comix psychedelia at Andrew Edlin. Plus, a sampling of outdoor public art in the event that you don't want to spend Memorial Day Weekend indoors. It's a good week to be in New York City. Here's what we've got in the hopper for arts events in the coming week:

Cory Arcangel, Pro Tools, at The Whitney Museum No artist embodies contemporary hacker culture quite like Cory Arcangel, the Brooklyn-based musician, programmer and artist who, in 2002, busted into the Super Mario Bros. video game to produce a significant piece of minimalist simplicity: an endlessly rolling reel of white, puffy digital clouds. (See it here.) Now The Whitney is devoting its entire fourth floor to some of his most recent works, which feature the same D.I.Y.-hacker ethos. There are modified video games (including a relentlessly frustrating version of a golf game that has been configured to never sink a putt), geometric drawings produced with a vintage pen plotter machine from the 1980s and an absolutely manic video of spliced-together heavy metal guitarists reconfigured to play Paganini's "Caprice No. 5." Many of the pieces are one liners — such as the stack of boxed 55" televisions, a piece called "Volume Management," which reads like a techno-fetish version of the Schrodinger's Cat paradox. (Would look great in the gift shop.) Others might seem one-dimensional on the surface, but in all actuality end up being more profound. A stack of synchronized dancing stands turn a tacky store display item and transform it into sculpture. This idea may hardly be new at a time when any old object can be tossed into a museum and referred to as ART. But this one plays on various levels: not only is it downright absorbing to stare at, it pays tribute to Marcel Duchamp's idea of the readymade and Sol Lewitt's highly clinical geometric cube sculptures -- if you happened to be looking at them while on acid (see the video below). Overall, it's a worthwhile show, one that will be infinitely more comprehensible to the non-techie set by checking out the current profile of him in The New Yorker. (Subscription required.) Opens on Thursday, in Manhattan.

Miss Van, Bailarinas, at Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea In the early 1990s, this French-born artist was one of the first women to work on the streets -- dotting Toulouse with her hand-painted poupées (dolls), half human/half animal hybrids that are all kinds of pin-up sexy. In her second solo exhibit at the gallery, Miss Van showcases her latest studio works -- paintings devoted to a new series of frilly, corseted figures. Opens on Thursday at 6 P.M., in Manhattan.

Living in Havana at the Marlborough Gallery in Chelsea Featuring five artists who live and work in Cuba, this exhibit tackles (and gently skewers) issues of migration, race, poverty, class and political iconography -- among other things. The best known of the bunch is the sculptor Kcho, known for his dramatic three-dimensional renderings of boats, the primary form of escape from Cuba. In addition, expect wry pieces from the likes of Abel Barroso, a sculptor with a knack for the mechanical (his pieces often include a hand crank), and William Pérez, who refashions political icons with lights and incised Plexiglas. Through June 18, in Manhattan.

Zap: Masters of Psychedelic Art, 1965-74 at Andrew Edlin Gallery in Chelsea This will no doubt be a must-see show for comic book and graphic design geeks of all stripes. Organized by comic artist and painter Gary Panter (of Jimbo fame), the exhibit looks at the original line-up of the famed San Francisco alternative comics house, Zap -- the company that put the ‘x’ in comics (literally). Featuring the work of artists such as the notorious R. Crumb, S. Clay Wilson and Robert Williams, the show is filled to the max with the sex-drugs-and-politics saturated imagery of the period. Should be a good trip. Through June 25, in Manhattan.

And, because ‘tis the season to be outdoors, a couple of public art installations worth checking out:

  • Sol Lewitt: Structures, 1965-2006 at City Hall Park Speaking of Sol Lewitt (the non-LSD version). Outside Bloomberg HQ (as in our municipal government, not the media company), various structures by the minimalist, conceptualist and all around geometric maniac go on view in City Hall Park this week. If you happen to be in the neighborhood for a protest, be sure to check out the art. Through December 2, in Manhattan.
  • Mark Di Suvero at Governor’s Island The good folks at Storm King, purveyors of monumental sculpture in the Hudson Valley, have gathered together a number of pieces by Mark Di Suvero, the kind of guy who’s never met a piece of steel he hasn’t wanted to bend, stack or carve. Get ready to feel very, very small. Opens Friday, on Governor’s Island.

Check out Cory Arcangel's piece "Research in Motion (Kinetic Sculpture #6)" at his Whitney Museum show, "Pro Tools" below.

 

French street artist Miss Van will be showcasing her latest hybrid human-animal paintings at the Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea. Above, 'Bailarinas,' a recent canvas.
Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Levine Gallery
French street artist Miss Van will be showcasing her latest hybrid human-animal paintings at the Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea. Above, 'Bailarinas,' a recent canvas.
'Bunny Love,' by Miss Van. The artist, who has worked on the streets since the early '90s (one of the first women on the European street art scene), paints figures inspired by manga and pin-ups.
Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Levine Gallery
'Bunny Love,' by Miss Van. The artist, who has worked on the streets since the early '90s (one of the first women on the European street art scene), paints figures inspired by manga and pin-ups.
A good reason to get over to Governor's Island: Storm King, the Hudson Valley arts center, has organized an exhibit of sculptures by Mark Di Suvero. Shown here: 'Will,' a piece from 1994.
The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
A good reason to get over to Governor's Island: Storm King, the Hudson Valley arts center, has organized an exhibit of sculptures by Mark Di Suvero. Shown here: 'Will,' a piece from 1994.
Di Suvero has the ability to make steel beams look like piles of pick-up sticks. This is public art served up a lo macho. 'Mahatma,' above, was created from 1978 to '79.
Gift of The Edward R. Broida Trust. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
Di Suvero has the ability to make steel beams look like piles of pick-up sticks. This is public art served up a lo macho. 'Mahatma,' above, was created from 1978 to '79.
At the Marlborough Gallery, an exhibit by contemporary Cuban artists, including Kcho, whose installation 'El Camino,' from 2010, is shown above.
Courtesy the artist and Marlborough Gallery
At the Marlborough Gallery, an exhibit by contemporary Cuban artists, including Kcho, whose installation 'El Camino,' from 2010, is shown above.
Kcho, who has numerous works on view as part of the 'Living in Havana' show at Marlborough, displays his perennial obsession with boats (the prime way to get out of Cuba) -- such as 'M,' from 2011.
Courtesy the artist and Marlborough Gallery
Kcho, who has numerous works on view as part of the 'Living in Havana' show at Marlborough, displays his perennial obsession with boats (the prime way to get out of Cuba) -- such as 'M,' from 2011.
The work of geometric-conceptual maniac Sol Lewitt will grace City Hall Park, in downtown Manhattan, including the fiberglass sculpture from 2005 called 'Splotch.'
Courtesy Public Art Fund © 2011 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
The work of geometric-conceptual maniac Sol Lewitt will grace City Hall Park, in downtown Manhattan, including the fiberglass sculpture from 2005 called 'Splotch.'
'Complex Form 6,' a work from the '80s by Lewitt. Though obsessed with the cube, in the late '80s the artist began exploring more complicated, irregular shapes and forms.
Courtesy Public Art Fund © 2011 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
'Complex Form 6,' a work from the '80s by Lewitt. Though obsessed with the cube, in the late '80s the artist began exploring more complicated, irregular shapes and forms.
As part of his solo exhibit at The Whitney, Arcangel will show his recent piece, 'Various Self Playing Bowling Games' -- a video game installation that pays tribute to the gutter ball.
© Eliot Wyman. Courtesy of Barbican Art Gallery, London
As part of his solo exhibit at The Whitney, Arcangel will show his recent piece, 'Various Self Playing Bowling Games' -- a video game installation that pays tribute to the gutter ball.
A still from Arcangel's bowling piece, a hacked video self-playing video game in which the player always rolls a gutter ball. (Clearly inspired by my style of bowling.)
© Eliot Wyman. Courtesy of Barbican Art Gallery, London
A still from Arcangel's bowling piece, a hacked video self-playing video game in which the player always rolls a gutter ball. (Clearly inspired by my style of bowling.)
In 'Masters,' an interactive piece from 2011, Arcangel hacked the popular golf video game so that the player can never sink a putt. Arcangel revels in creating a sense of frustration.
Carolina A. Miranda
In 'Masters,' an interactive piece from 2011, Arcangel hacked the popular golf video game so that the player can never sink a putt. Arcangel revels in creating a sense of frustration.
At Andrew Edlin Gallery, a tribute to the psychedelic masters of Zap Comix, the alternative comics house of the '60s and '70s. Above, a work by Victor Moscoso.
Courtesy of Victor Moscoso and Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York
At Andrew Edlin Gallery, a tribute to the psychedelic masters of Zap Comix, the alternative comics house of the '60s and '70s. Above, a work by Victor Moscoso.

Tags:

More in:

The Morning Brief

Enter your email address and we’ll send you our top 5 stories every day, plus breaking news and weather.

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.

Sponsored

About Gallerina

Carolina A. Miranda is a regular contributor to WNYC and blogs about the arts for the station as "Gallerina." In addition to that, she contributes articles on culture, travel and the arts to a variety of national and regional media, including Time, ArtNews, Travel + Leisure and Budget Travel and Florida Travel + Life. She has reported on the burgeoning industry of skatepark design, architectural pedagogy in Southern California, the presence of street art in museums and Lima's burgeoning food scene, among many other subjects. In 2008, she was named one of eight fellows in the USC Annenberg/Getty Arts Journalism Program for her arts and architecture blog C-Monster.net, which has received mentions in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. In January of 2010, the Times named her one of nine people to follow on Twitter. Got a tip? E-mail her at c [@] c-monster [dot] net

Feeds

Supported by