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War Correspondence

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Thursday, May 19, 2011

Sebastian Junger and photojournalists Mike Kamber and Christopher Anderson discuss Tim Hetherington’s life, the challenges of war photography, and the close-knit community of war correspondents. Our latest Underreported segment looks at why a boat of African migrants was left to drift in the open water for weeks without anyone coming to its aid. And on Backstory, Jane Mayer discusses the government's prosecution of whistle-blowers.

Remembering Tim Hetherington

Sebastian Junger, who co-directed the film "Restrepo" with Tim Hetherington, talks about the loss of his friend, who was killed in April while covering the conflict in Libya. He's written a remembrance of Hetherington in Vanity Fair. He’s joined by photojournalists Mike Kamber and Christopher Anderson, who were personally changed by Hetherington’s death. They’ll reminisce about Hetherington’s life, the challenges of war photography, and the close-knit community of war correspondents. They're featured in the article "You Never Forget that First Taste of War" in New York Magazine.

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Underreported: Boat of Migrant Africans Left to Drift for 16 Days

In late March and early April, a boat filled with dozens of African migrants drifted in the Mediterranean for 16 days with almost no food, fuel or water. Although the boat made contact with various European authorities, no rescue was attempted and 61 people died. On this week’s Underreported, Fred Abrahams, Special Advisor at Human Rights Watch, describes what happened aboard the ship and why an investigation has been launched into how NATO and its member states responded to the ship’s distress calls.

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Backstory: The Obama Administration's Crackdown on Leaks

New Yorker staff writer Jane Mayer describes how the Obama Administration is cracking down on leaks by prosecuting whistle-blowers. Her article, The Secret Sharer, appears in the May 23 issue of The New Yorker.  

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June's Book: The Tragedy of Arthur, by Arthur Phillips

We kicked off our book club with the novel The Tragedy of Arthur, by Arthur Phillips. On June 16 in the Greene Space, Leonard moderated a discussion with Arthur Philips, and people in the audience were able to ask their questions about the book. Watch the video below starting 40 minutes in. 

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