Streams

November Outings

Monday, November 02, 2009

November is upon us, the weather is nicer than it was in July and the Performance Club has two events coming up. Mark your calendars and let me know if you're in or out.

1. November 13, 8 p.m., 100 Grand Street (2nd floor), Manhattan: First up, we've been invited to attend "Cycatrix Adaptitude" by one of our very own members, Kirk Bromley. Here's the blurb:

"While traveling in Bucharest, Kirk Wood Bromley, artistic director of Inverse Theater, stumbled across a troupe of Romanian performers whose 'party plays' are legendary in the back-alley bars of the Balkan capital. Now, in collaboration with Meistro Stelian Virgiliu Vasilica's Cel Mal Bun Teatru Fiecare, he's bringing the English version to America for a Tour of NYC so you can meld with the madness."

And here's what I think after seeing some of the show at an evening rehearsal in Williamsburg: It's a lewd, brainy, assaultive affair. Completely overstuffed with language. I think it will enrage some of you and delight others. I think we'll have something to talk about. After all, who among us has seen Psychopoetic Romanian Vaudeville?

So ...it's free, with a $5 suggested donation after the show (there will be beer). To enter, you must RSVP to contact@inversetheater.org, and you are not confirmed until you hear back. Please also let me know if I should expect you, via the comments section like always.

2. November 21, 8 p.m., chashama 679, 679 Third Ave at 43rd Street: As many of you know, it's Performa-time, with the live-art biennial in full swing as of this past weekend. Lots and lots of events for people to check out. On the last weekend, we'll be heading to "Mother Earth, Sister Moon."

Performa goes back to the future...Performa goes back to the future...

Here's the blurb:

"For Performa 09, Polish artist Christian Tomaszewski, in collaboration with video and performance artist Joanna Malinowska, considers how the future was imagined by the Communist regimes of the former Soviet Bloc. 'Mother Earth Sister Moon' explores this theme by examining the fashion and style elements related to a diverse range of Eastern Bloc phenomena, including the Soviet space program, sci-fi film and literature of the era, and the cults surrounding the mysterious 1908 explosion over the Tunguska River Valley in central Siberia. This research will manifest itself as a giant reconstruction of the suit worn by the first woman in space—Russian astronaut Valentina Tereshkova—that also pays tribute to the sculpture 'Hon-en Katedral' ('She-a Cathedral'), an enormous female figure conceived and built by Niki de Saint Phalle with Jean Tinguely in 1966. Visitors to the sculpture will be able to walk inside it and—at designated 'performance' times—view a fashion show, with music by Masami Tomihisa, featuring both reconstructions of actual garments and new designs that evoke the Soviet space program and science-fiction films. In this way, the live show will act as a curated design exhibition in motion."

Performance and fashion, the star-crossed romance continues. This should be glittery fun, and , really, no self respecting Performance Club member can miss the performance biennial.

Tickets, which can be ordered here, are just $12, and we have a discount code. I'm emailing it out to current members - if you are a first-time P. Clubber and would like in, let me know and I'll send it to you as well. Of course, let me know anyway if you're coming, so I can figure out where we'll go after.

Guests:

Cycatrix Adaptitude, Krik Bromley, Joanna Malinowska and Christian Tomaszewski

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About Performance Club

Open to everyone, the Performance Club is a freewheeling conversation about New York performance of all kinds, from experimental theater to gallery installations to contemporary dance. We go, we talk (online and at bars and cafes, with artists and amongst ourselves), we disagree and, sometimes, we change each other’s minds.

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