Streams

The CIA After Bin Laden's Death

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Legacy of Ashes author Tim Weiner joins us to look at how the death of Osama Bin Laden changes the public profile of the CIA. We’ll also look at the agency’s long history of targeted killings.

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Tim Weiner
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Comments [6]

Ola

I am from Sweden and started to listen to WNYC a few months ago and was immediately reminded of the two faces of USA. I must admit that I lost hope a few times during the former presidents eight years of horror, but I just love liberal americans. The reporting / analysis of the assasination of bin Laden is more nuanced than in most Swedish media. This channel and the shows, Studio 360 and Radiolab are favourites, makes me proud of USA.

May. 06 2011 05:35 PM
geb

Our targeted assassinations via drone proxies appears to be a sensible cost/benefit decision (ignoring the moral issues). That is, until US citizens are assassinated by terrorist drones- overseas or in the US. The Golden Rule is the right context to address their use- how would we feel if both sides were evenly matched technologically?

May. 04 2011 12:36 PM
CL from NYC

Why is the fact that it took TEN YEARS for the CIA to accomplish this mission not being discussed? What was broken and how can we be assured that it is fixed?

May. 04 2011 12:24 PM
Robert Voluz from Staten Island

Does the CIA see the Saudi Wahabists as a threat to America?

May. 04 2011 12:23 PM
Ramon from Forest Hills, NY

Why does the CIA get the blame for the so-called faulty intel. Wasn't the bad intel the result of the White House in search of any available justification to invade Iraq? Thanks.

May. 04 2011 12:20 PM
antonio from bayside

Does Mr. Weiner think the Bush administration lied to go to war? Is that what he meant about the application of intelligence?

May. 04 2011 12:16 PM

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